Cookies must be enabled to use this web application.

To allow this site to use cookies, use the steps that apply to your browser below. If your browser is not listed below, or if you have any questions regarding this site, please contact us.

Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • 1. Select "Internet Options" from the Tools menu.
  • 2. Click on the "Privacy" tab.
  • 3. Click the "Default" button.
  • 4. Click "OK" to save changes.
Chrome Chrome
  • 1. Click the "Spanner" icon in the top right of the browser.
  • 2. Click Options and change to the "Under the Hood" tab.
  • 3. Scroll down until you see "Cookie settings:".
  • 4. Set this to "Allow all cookies".
Firefox Firefox
  • 1. Go to the "Tools" menu and select "Options".
  • 2. Click the "Privacy" icon on the top of the window.
  • 3. Click on the "Cookies" tab.
  • 4. Check the box corresponding to "Allow sites to set Cookies.
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Opera Opera
  • 1. Click on the "Tools" menu and then click Preferences.
  • 2. Change to the Advanced tab, and to the cookie section.
  • 3. Select "Accept cookies only from the site I visit" or "Accept cookies".
  • 4. Ensure "Delete new cookies when exiting Opera" is not ticked.
  • 5. Click OK.
Netscape and Mozilla Suite Netscape and Mozilla Suite
  • 1. Select "Preferences" from the Edit menu.
  • 2. Click on the arrow next to "Privacy & Security".
  • 3. Under "Privacy & Security" select "Cookies".
  • 4. Select "Enable all cookies".
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Safari Safari
  • 1. Click on the "Cog" icon in Safari.
  • 2. Click Preferences.
  • 3. Change to the Security tab.
  • 4. Select "Only from sites I visit" or "Allow".
  • 5. Close the dialog using the cross.
Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available

See inside

Book details
  • Genre:FICTION
  • SubGenre:Literary
  • Language:English
  • Pages:250
  • Format:Paperback
  • eBook ISBN:9780997913767
  • Paperback ISBN:9780997913750

Summer of Love and Evil

by Michael Kinnamon

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available

See inside

Overview

"The narrative is powerful in its solid simplicity and dramatic, quietly vivid events. Although the time is past, the novel is very much of the present." — Ellen Cooney, Author, One Night Two Souls Went Walking.

It's 1967 in rural Iowa as drugs, corporate farming, and Vietnam are beginning to take their toll on small-town American life. When Charles Weaver's plans for the summer after high school graduation go awry, he ends up working for the street crew in his hometown before heading off to college.

Charles, school valedictorian and son of a lawyer, not only knows nothing about driving tractors and laying asphalt, he can't remember even meeting the regular members of the crew: Dexter, who collects discarded furniture for the house he's going to build someday in the Ozarks; the Shakespeare-quoting Moss, a teacher in rural schools before consolidation of the district, and their boss, Clyde, whose strength and temper are legendary in Savannah County.

Two things change Charles's summer experience and life dramatically. On the spur of the moment he asks Clyde's daughter, Frankie, to go on a date and their romance is a surprise to everyone. Then, the oldest log church in Iowa is destroyed by fire, and Charles stumbles upon a badly-burned body while cleaning up debris. Was this an outsider mixing meth in the hard-to-find church, as the sheriff contends? Or was someone local involved, as Charles suspects? Charles, the sheriff, and Frankie collide in a stunning climax of this novel about a boy becoming a man through his growing awareness of the complexity of love and the subtle power of evil.

"A lovely, clear-eyed book about a young man's dawning awareness of extraordinary men and women, as well as the hard realities, in a Midwestern town where he's grown up. A moving evocation of people living in a world that's undergoing change, and the ways, some deeply compassionate, others coldly cruel, with which they move into the unknown." -- Douglas Penick, Author

Description

It's 1967 in rural Iowa as drugs, corporate farming, and Vietnam are beginning to take their toll on small-town American life. When Charles Weaver's plans for the summer after high school graduation go awry, he ends up working for the street crew in his hometown before heading off to college.

Charles, school valedictorian and son of a lawyer, not only knows nothing about driving tractors and laying asphalt, he can't remember even meeting the regular members of the crew: Dexter, who collects discarded furniture for the house he's going to build someday in the Ozarks; the Shakespeare-quoting Moss, a teacher in rural schools before consolidation of the district, and their boss, Clyde, whose strength and temper are legendary in Savannah County.

Two things change Charles's summer experience and life dramatically. On the spur of the moment, he asks Clyde's daughter, Frankie, to go on a date and their romance is a surprise to everyone. Then, the oldest log church in Iowa is destroyed by fire, and Charles stumbles upon a badly-burned body while cleaning up debris. Was this an outsider mixing meth in the hard-to-find church, as the sheriff contends? Or was someone local involved, as Charles suspects? Charles, the sheriff, and Frankie collide in a stunning climax of this novel about a boy becoming a man through his growing awareness of the complexity of love and the subtle power of evil.

"A tale of profound, irrevocable changes in the middle of America in the 1960s, as a sheltered, upper-middle-class teenager becomes transformed, not only in his own physical and spiritual self, but also in his awareness of class and race and forces of discrimination he'd never had a clue of before. The narrative is powerful in its solid simplicity and dramatic, quietly vivid events. Although the time is past, the novel is very much of the present." -- Ellen Cooney, author, One Night Two Souls Went Walking; The Mountaintop School for Dogs, and more.

"A lovely, clear-eyed book about a young man's dawning awareness of extraordinary men and women, as well as the hard realities, in a Midwestern town where he's grown up. A moving evocation of people living in a world that's undergoing change, and the ways, some deeply compassionate, others coldly cruel, with which they move into the unknown." -- Douglas Penick, author, Journey of the North Star

"A teenager becomes a man over the course of one summer as he learns about love and the nature of hard work in small-town Iowa. As the summer unfolds, a fire at Iowa's oldest log church shakes up the town, setting Charles and the town's sheriff on a collision course. The writing is lean with moments of tenderness, and explores themes of class distinction and the common humanity that binds us all together." -- Don Trowden, author, Normal Family Trilogy

About the author
Michael Kinnamon, a native of Iowa, is a former professor of Christian theology, author of several nonfiction books, and highly regarded as a scholar in the field of ecumenical and interfaith studies. He is the former General Secretary of the National Council of Churches, headquartered in Washington, DC. He lives with his wife, Mardine Davis, in San Diego. This is his debut novel.
Thanks for submitting a review!

Your review will need to be approved by the author before being posted.

See Inside
Front Cover

Loading book cover...

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Session Expiration WarningYour session is due to expire.

Your online session is due to expire shortly.
Would you like to extend your session and remain logged in?

Session Expired

Your session has expired.We're sorry, but your online session has expired.
Please log back into your account to continue.

This site uses cookies. Continuing to use this site without changing your cookie settings means that you consent to those cookies to enhance site navigation and the overall user experience. Learn more about our privacy policy or learn more about how to turn off cookies.