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Signature
Legendary African American Distinctive Signatures
by Rubin Benson / Bashir

Overview


A collection of individual hand written signatures of Legendary African Americans never before seen. This book shows their actual handwriting of their name or signature each person used. The uniqueness is as impressive as their individual achievements today and historically. In 1830 North Carolina adopted into law the act to prevent all persons from teaching "Slaves" to read or write. Despite the racism slave did learn to read and write. Although many only signed docments using ascribed "X" in lieu of a personal signature. This "X" by the way had to be witnessed by a "White" induvidual to be legally authentic. This book shows the distinctive identityof the 120 individual African Americans and their unique scribed signatures.

Read more

Description


In the year 1830, the state of North Carolina adopted into law the act to prevent all persons from teaching slaves to read or write. The teaching of slaves to read or write, has a tendency to excite dis- satisfaction in the minds of slaves, and will produce insurrection and rebellion, to the manifest injury of citizens of this state of North Carolina. Any free person, who shall hereafter teach, or attempt to teach, any slave within the state to read or write or give or sell to such slave any books or pamphlets, shall be liable to indictment in any court of record in this State of North Carolina. And the slave shall be imprisoned; and or whipped at the discretion of the court, not exceeding 39 lashes and not less than 20 lashes. "Act Passed" by the General Assembly of North Carolina at the Session of 1830 (Raleigh:1830). Despite the racism of North Carolina and other united states in America, slaves did learn to read and write. Even though many slaves were not literate they would sign documents using a scribed "X" in lieu of a signature. The courts permitted this as long as the X-mark was witnessed. The individual signatures enclosed in this unique presentation is not a critique of their "penmanship". On the contrary, our intention is only to show a individuals style of "handwriting" their name. Iconic as these African-Americans are, their signatures reveal a vibrant visual attached to their personality. Children today are not encouraged to write in cursive, so it is becoming a lost art. This book shows the beautiful penmanship of iconic figures of our past and present.

Read more

About the author


Rubin A. Benson is an award-winning creative director, recognized for his exceptional talent to translate ideas into holistic visual interpretations. Partial list of his awards and honors include: Communication of Excellence to Black Audiences-CEBA Award of Excellence (1985 Album Jacket Design Award), The World Institute of Black Communications, Organization of Black Designers, Washington, DC (1990 Graphic Design Award), National Black Chamber of Commerce (NBCC), National Urban League (1995 Urban Advertising Design Award), Cheyney University of Pennsylvania Alumni Award, 2000. CEBA Awards Panel Judge (1978-1992) For nearly 50 years, he's worked with numerous high-profile clients including Philadelphia International Records, Art Museum, Philadelphia Dance Company, Mann Music Center for Performing Arts, The National Black Music Association, CBS Records, MasterCard International, World Affairs Council, Congressional Black Caucus, Universal Companies, Bank of America, and many others. In addition, he previously worked for several advertising agencies including Benton & Bowles Advertising, Ogilvy & Mather, J. Walter Thompson Advertising, UniWorld Group, Black Enterprise Magazine, and the National Black Network. With a seasoned set of diverse skills and a desire to be independent, Rubin started his own design studio under the name First Impressions Design Group in January 1976. In March of the same year, he moved to center city Philadelphia and opened the doors to First Impressions on South 13th Street. He would outgrow the modest space in a years' time. Later, First Impressions studio would move to Old City Philadelphia, New Market Square in 1977. In this space, First Impressions would establish a name and reputation for designing creative solutions in graphic design. This legacy is proudly demonstrated today. Unwilling to concede to retirement, Rubin has again transformed himself as a prolific writer, publicist, and author. His zest for books led him to publish: Top of the Clock: Minister Jeremiah Shabazz: Exclusive Interview (First Impressions,2011) and Kenny Gamble & Leon A. Huff, Legendary Rhythm & Blues Songwriters: The Visual Legacy, Album Covers with Artist Biographies (Philadelphia Music Makers, 2015). His third book titled Mandela In Focus: Photographs by Kevin Joseph, personal photographer to the late Nelson Mandela (First Impressions, 2016) is scheduled for release later this year, followed by his fourth book titled Signs: Signatures of Famous Historical and Current African-Americans (First Impressions, 2016). Currently, he is working on a film documentary titled "The John Coltrane House" and has completed the film "Documentary of Jeremiah Shabazz" and Fine Art plans to create artistic graphic images using his rare collection of photographs compiled from his creative past.
Read more

Book details

Genre:EDUCATION

Subgenre:Philosophy & Social Aspects

Language:English

Pages:254

Format:Paperback

Paperback ISBN:9781737709213


Overview


A collection of individual hand written signatures of Legendary African Americans never before seen. This book shows their actual handwriting of their name or signature each person used. The uniqueness is as impressive as their individual achievements today and historically. In 1830 North Carolina adopted into law the act to prevent all persons from teaching "Slaves" to read or write. Despite the racism slave did learn to read and write. Although many only signed docments using ascribed "X" in lieu of a personal signature. This "X" by the way had to be witnessed by a "White" induvidual to be legally authentic. This book shows the distinctive identityof the 120 individual African Americans and their unique scribed signatures.

Read more

Description


In the year 1830, the state of North Carolina adopted into law the act to prevent all persons from teaching slaves to read or write. The teaching of slaves to read or write, has a tendency to excite dis- satisfaction in the minds of slaves, and will produce insurrection and rebellion, to the manifest injury of citizens of this state of North Carolina. Any free person, who shall hereafter teach, or attempt to teach, any slave within the state to read or write or give or sell to such slave any books or pamphlets, shall be liable to indictment in any court of record in this State of North Carolina. And the slave shall be imprisoned; and or whipped at the discretion of the court, not exceeding 39 lashes and not less than 20 lashes. "Act Passed" by the General Assembly of North Carolina at the Session of 1830 (Raleigh:1830). Despite the racism of North Carolina and other united states in America, slaves did learn to read and write. Even though many slaves were not literate they would sign documents using a scribed "X" in lieu of a signature. The courts permitted this as long as the X-mark was witnessed. The individual signatures enclosed in this unique presentation is not a critique of their "penmanship". On the contrary, our intention is only to show a individuals style of "handwriting" their name. Iconic as these African-Americans are, their signatures reveal a vibrant visual attached to their personality. Children today are not encouraged to write in cursive, so it is becoming a lost art. This book shows the beautiful penmanship of iconic figures of our past and present.

Read more

About the author


Rubin A. Benson is an award-winning creative director, recognized for his exceptional talent to translate ideas into holistic visual interpretations. Partial list of his awards and honors include: Communication of Excellence to Black Audiences-CEBA Award of Excellence (1985 Album Jacket Design Award), The World Institute of Black Communications, Organization of Black Designers, Washington, DC (1990 Graphic Design Award), National Black Chamber of Commerce (NBCC), National Urban League (1995 Urban Advertising Design Award), Cheyney University of Pennsylvania Alumni Award, 2000. CEBA Awards Panel Judge (1978-1992) For nearly 50 years, he's worked with numerous high-profile clients including Philadelphia International Records, Art Museum, Philadelphia Dance Company, Mann Music Center for Performing Arts, The National Black Music Association, CBS Records, MasterCard International, World Affairs Council, Congressional Black Caucus, Universal Companies, Bank of America, and many others. In addition, he previously worked for several advertising agencies including Benton & Bowles Advertising, Ogilvy & Mather, J. Walter Thompson Advertising, UniWorld Group, Black Enterprise Magazine, and the National Black Network. With a seasoned set of diverse skills and a desire to be independent, Rubin started his own design studio under the name First Impressions Design Group in January 1976. In March of the same year, he moved to center city Philadelphia and opened the doors to First Impressions on South 13th Street. He would outgrow the modest space in a years' time. Later, First Impressions studio would move to Old City Philadelphia, New Market Square in 1977. In this space, First Impressions would establish a name and reputation for designing creative solutions in graphic design. This legacy is proudly demonstrated today. Unwilling to concede to retirement, Rubin has again transformed himself as a prolific writer, publicist, and author. His zest for books led him to publish: Top of the Clock: Minister Jeremiah Shabazz: Exclusive Interview (First Impressions,2011) and Kenny Gamble & Leon A. Huff, Legendary Rhythm & Blues Songwriters: The Visual Legacy, Album Covers with Artist Biographies (Philadelphia Music Makers, 2015). His third book titled Mandela In Focus: Photographs by Kevin Joseph, personal photographer to the late Nelson Mandela (First Impressions, 2016) is scheduled for release later this year, followed by his fourth book titled Signs: Signatures of Famous Historical and Current African-Americans (First Impressions, 2016). Currently, he is working on a film documentary titled "The John Coltrane House" and has completed the film "Documentary of Jeremiah Shabazz" and Fine Art plans to create artistic graphic images using his rare collection of photographs compiled from his creative past.
Read more

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