Cookies must be enabled to use this web application.

To allow this site to use cookies, use the steps that apply to your browser below. If your browser is not listed below, or if you have any questions regarding this site, please contact us.

Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • 1. Select "Internet Options" from the Tools menu.
  • 2. Click on the "Privacy" tab.
  • 3. Click the "Default" button.
  • 4. Click "OK" to save changes.
Chrome Chrome
  • 1. Click the "Spanner" icon in the top right of the browser.
  • 2. Click Options and change to the "Under the Hood" tab.
  • 3. Scroll down until you see "Cookie settings:".
  • 4. Set this to "Allow all cookies".
Firefox Firefox
  • 1. Go to the "Tools" menu and select "Options".
  • 2. Click the "Privacy" icon on the top of the window.
  • 3. Click on the "Cookies" tab.
  • 4. Check the box corresponding to "Allow sites to set Cookies.
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Opera Opera
  • 1. Click on the "Tools" menu and then click Preferences.
  • 2. Change to the Advanced tab, and to the cookie section.
  • 3. Select "Accept cookies only from the site I visit" or "Accept cookies".
  • 4. Ensure "Delete new cookies when exiting Opera" is not ticked.
  • 5. Click OK.
Netscape and Mozilla Suite Netscape and Mozilla Suite
  • 1. Select "Preferences" from the Edit menu.
  • 2. Click on the arrow next to "Privacy & Security".
  • 3. Under "Privacy & Security" select "Cookies".
  • 4. Select "Enable all cookies".
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Safari Safari
  • 1. Click on the "Cog" icon in Safari.
  • 2. Click Preferences.
  • 3. Change to the Security tab.
  • 4. Select "Only from sites I visit" or "Allow".
  • 5. Close the dialog using the cross.
Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
  • SubGenre:Personal Memoirs
  • Language:English
  • Pages:473
  • eBook ISBN:9781098344887

Karen Ann

The Quinlans Tell Their Story

by Joseph Quinlan , Julia Quinlan and Phyliss Battelle View author's profile page

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Overview
This is the story of one family's devotion and courage in the face of the tragedy which has become a landmark in medical and legal history. The Quinlans tell here, in their own words, of their love for Karen, of the agony which they shared in reaching the decision to instigate the court proceedings which eventually led to the famous New Jersey State Supreme Court ruling, of the brilliant young lawyer who volunteered to fight for Karen Ann's cause, and of the supportive role of friends, doctors, nurses, and the Church.
Description
On the night of April 15, 1975, Joseph and Julia Quinlan were awakened by a phone call, notifying them that Karen Ann, their oldest daughter, had been rushed to the hospital in a coma. Karen Ann never regained consciousness, nor has the cause of the come ever been determined. This is the story of one family's devotion and courage in the face of the tragedy which has become a landmark in medical and legal history. The Quinlans tell here, in their own words, of their love for Karen, of the agony which they shared in reaching the decision to instigate the court proceedings which eventually led to the famous New Jersey State Supreme Court ruling, of the brilliant young lawyer who volunteered to fight for Karen Ann's cause, and of the supportive role of friends, doctors, nurses, and the Church. Karen Ann's case has been sensationalized and often distorted by the press. But the true story behind the publicity is told here with quiet eloquence – and it is a far more profound tragedy than the one told in the headlines. What happened to Karen is unique, but the situation which the Quinlans faced is becoming all too commonplace in these days of rapid advances in medical technology. Karen's plight touches all of us, as do the courage and faith of her parents – whose honesty in the face of suffering won Karen Ann the right to rest in God's hands.
About the author
Joseph T. Quinlan was an early pioneer of the "right to die" movement for the terminally ill. Born in West New York, NJ on April 2, 1925, Mr. Quinlan was a private first class in the Army in World War II from 1943 to 1945 with the 84th Infantry Division in Europe. He was wounded during the Battle of the Bulge in 1944 where he lost his left forearm and right 5th finger. Mr. Quinlan was awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Bronze Battle Star, the European, African and Middle Eastern Campaign ribbons and the Purple Heart. "My Dad was the most gentle and humble man I have ever known. Yet he performed heroically at a crucial moment in WWII, the Battle of the Bulge. As well as a Purple Heart, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, (DSC) for "extraordinary heroism," said his son John Quinlan. "He never told anyone what he did, not even Mom or his best friend. We only discovered the full extent of his heroism in 2013, when Mom requested a copy of his Purple Heart and was astonished when she received a package of medals and letters from the War Department. A copy of the commendation is available on line at karenannquinlanhospice.org/medals. Joseph married Julia Duane on September 22, 1946, and they were blessed with three children and fifty years together. Joseph died peacefully in in home under the medical care of his wife and Karen Ann Quinlan Hospice. After the war Mr. Quinlan worked for the Warner-Lambert pharmaceutical company in Morris Plains, NJ. In his private life Mr. Quinlan was a quiet man, devout in his Catholic faith. He shunned the spotlight and worked quietly with his wife, counseling other families around the country with terminally ill relatives. He served as chairman of Karen Ann Quinlan Hospice and guided its growth. "Joe was truly a gentleman of quiet demeanor, deep faith and principled courage," said Paul W. Armstrong, the lawyer and close family friend who represented the Quinlans during the landmark 1976 decision by the New Jersey Supreme Court supporting the couples request to turn off Karen Ann's respirator. The ultimate unanimous ruling become known as sanctioning a "right to die" for the terminally ill. It was said by Monsignor Trapasso, a family friend and spiritual adviser that Mr. Quinlan frowned on the phrase "right to die," instead feeling that the family wanted to let God and nature take care of Karen and they wanted a fundamental choice in rejecting "futile" medical treatment that had "no positive good" prolonging the life of a terminally ill person. The legal legacy of the Quinlans long ordeal is the landmark 1976 decision by the New Jersey Supreme Court supporting the couple's request to turn off Karen Ann's respirator. The second legacy is the Karen Ann Quinlan Hospice that the Quinlans founded in 1980 with the proceeds from a film and book rights to the story of their daughter's life and death.

Book Reviews

to submit a book review
Thanks for submitting a review!

Your review will need to be approved by the author before being posted.

See Inside
Front Cover

Loading book cover...

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Session Expiration WarningYour session is due to expire.

Your online session is due to expire shortly.
Would you like to extend your session and remain logged in?

Session Expired

Your session has expired.We're sorry, but your online session has expired.
Please log back into your account to continue.

This site uses cookies. Continuing to use this site without changing your cookie settings means that you consent to those cookies to enhance site navigation and the overall user experience. Learn more about our privacy policy or learn more about how to turn off cookies.