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About the author


LAUREN BETH EISENBERG DAVIS is a Baltimore-based writer and award-winning photographer. In 2014, she was Artist-in-Residence at Joshua Tree National Park in California. Her prior work has been published in The Baltimore Sun, Avotaynu, Art Times, New Lines from the Old Line State, The Gunpowder Review, Scribble, and Pen in Hand.


You can follow Lauren on:

Website:

https://laurenbetheisenbergdavis.com/home.html


Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/LaurenBethEisenbergDavis/


Goodreads:

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/19324900.Lauren_Beth_Eisenberg_Davis


Read more
Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Songs of Joshua Tree
An Odyssey Through the Music History of the Park and Its Surrounds
by Lauren Beth Eisenberg Davis

Overview


Songs of Joshua Tree explores music over the course of history in the area that now comprises Joshua Tree National Park and its gateway towns. This book is the result of the author's work as artist-in-residence at the park in 2014. It provides a folk-life ethnohistorical look, in an accessible story form, at music of the Native Americans who inhabited the park starting in the 1600s; the songs of the homesteaders, miners and cattlemen of the 1800s and 1900s; and the contemporary music scene of the last 50 years. The geographic area covered by the book is Joshua Tree National Park itself, and the towns of Twentynine Palms, Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Pioneertown, and Landers – towns whose history is intertwined with that of the park property. The musical genres covered include sacred and leisure music of the Indian tribes, folk music, rock and roll, jazz, classical, and non-traditional forms of music such as therapeutic sound baths, and the natural sounds of the park wilderness. The focus of the book is primarily on music of the people who made the area their home, but also touches on famous musicians who have come to Joshua Tree, to perform, to reflect, to create.
Read more

Description


Living alone at the remote Lost Horse Cabin — beyond the Service Road Only sign, beyond the Locked Gate Ahead sign, beyond the Do Not Enter sign, up the long, winding dirt road flanked by Joshua trees, Mojave yuccas, fields of desert dandelions, occasional stands of purple lupine, blooming cacti, and other desert wildflowers — I spent two weeks as Artist-in-Residence at Joshua Tree National Park in California. This book is the project that resulted from my residency. Songs of Joshua Tree is a work of literary art — using oral history, documented artifacts, and my experience living in the region for several weeks — exploring music over the course of history in the area that now comprises Joshua Tree National Park and its surrounds. During my tenure at the park, I met with descendants of pioneer families and musicians from the three primary Native American tribes that had inhabited the park; I explored the park seeking places and artifacts of musical significance; and I attended local music events. I kept a daily travel journal. Each night I fell asleep to the sound of the wind howling through the park, and awoke in the morning to the who-who, knock-knock-knock of the great horned owl and ladder-backed woodpecker in my yard, which served to underscore that in addition to the music people sang, played, and wrote here, the desert makes its own music. Because there was no Internet connectivity or cell phone reception at the cabin, the lack of digital distractions opened all senses to the desert environment. I felt a heightened awareness of the sounds around me. Here, every sound stands on its own. With no minuscule microphones, and no recording equipment, I recorded the sounds of the desert — both of human musicians and of the landscape itself — in the only way I know: with my words. This book is meant to be neither an exhaustive inventory of every music event nor every song written in the area. It paints the landscape of music that touched and shaped the lives of people here. Each culture brought its own contribution to the history of the park, including music history. Sometimes these groups or individuals influenced each other, but there is not a holistic arc of music progression seen over the course of time; there are pockets of "aha" moments when something in a later era evokes something earlier in history, and there are specific instances of one group borrowing music traditions from another. To a large degree, the progression mirrored what happened musically everywhere in this country, but the specific landscape and events of this desert park contributed a unique slant and mysticism that can only be understood by looking at the physical features of the desert and its oases, and the historic events that took place here.
Read more

Overview


Songs of Joshua Tree explores music over the course of history in the area that now comprises Joshua Tree National Park and its gateway towns. This book is the result of the author's work as artist-in-residence at the park in 2014. It provides a folk-life ethnohistorical look, in an accessible story form, at music of the Native Americans who inhabited the park starting in the 1600s; the songs of the homesteaders, miners and cattlemen of the 1800s and 1900s; and the contemporary music scene of the last 50 years. The geographic area covered by the book is Joshua Tree National Park itself, and the towns of Twentynine Palms, Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Pioneertown, and Landers – towns whose history is intertwined with that of the park property. The musical genres covered include sacred and leisure music of the Indian tribes, folk music, rock and roll, jazz, classical, and non-traditional forms of music such as therapeutic sound baths, and the natural sounds of the park wilderness. The focus of the book is primarily on music of the people who made the area their home, but also touches on famous musicians who have come to Joshua Tree, to perform, to reflect, to create.

Read more

Description


Living alone at the remote Lost Horse Cabin — beyond the Service Road Only sign, beyond the Locked Gate Ahead sign, beyond the Do Not Enter sign, up the long, winding dirt road flanked by Joshua trees, Mojave yuccas, fields of desert dandelions, occasional stands of purple lupine, blooming cacti, and other desert wildflowers — I spent two weeks as Artist-in-Residence at Joshua Tree National Park in California. This book is the project that resulted from my residency. Songs of Joshua Tree is a work of literary art — using oral history, documented artifacts, and my experience living in the region for several weeks — exploring music over the course of history in the area that now comprises Joshua Tree National Park and its surrounds. During my tenure at the park, I met with descendants of pioneer families and musicians from the three primary Native American tribes that had inhabited the park; I explored the park seeking places and artifacts of musical significance; and I attended local music events. I kept a daily travel journal. Each night I fell asleep to the sound of the wind howling through the park, and awoke in the morning to the who-who, knock-knock-knock of the great horned owl and ladder-backed woodpecker in my yard, which served to underscore that in addition to the music people sang, played, and wrote here, the desert makes its own music. Because there was no Internet connectivity or cell phone reception at the cabin, the lack of digital distractions opened all senses to the desert environment. I felt a heightened awareness of the sounds around me. Here, every sound stands on its own. With no minuscule microphones, and no recording equipment, I recorded the sounds of the desert — both of human musicians and of the landscape itself — in the only way I know: with my words. This book is meant to be neither an exhaustive inventory of every music event nor every song written in the area. It paints the landscape of music that touched and shaped the lives of people here. Each culture brought its own contribution to the history of the park, including music history. Sometimes these groups or individuals influenced each other, but there is not a holistic arc of music progression seen over the course of time; there are pockets of "aha" moments when something in a later era evokes something earlier in history, and there are specific instances of one group borrowing music traditions from another. To a large degree, the progression mirrored what happened musically everywhere in this country, but the specific landscape and events of this desert park contributed a unique slant and mysticism that can only be understood by looking at the physical features of the desert and its oases, and the historic events that took place here.

Read more

Book details

Genre:MUSIC

Subgenre:Ethnomusicology

Language:English

Pages:280

Format:Paperback

Paperback ISBN:9781543971910


Overview


Songs of Joshua Tree explores music over the course of history in the area that now comprises Joshua Tree National Park and its gateway towns. This book is the result of the author's work as artist-in-residence at the park in 2014. It provides a folk-life ethnohistorical look, in an accessible story form, at music of the Native Americans who inhabited the park starting in the 1600s; the songs of the homesteaders, miners and cattlemen of the 1800s and 1900s; and the contemporary music scene of the last 50 years. The geographic area covered by the book is Joshua Tree National Park itself, and the towns of Twentynine Palms, Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Pioneertown, and Landers – towns whose history is intertwined with that of the park property. The musical genres covered include sacred and leisure music of the Indian tribes, folk music, rock and roll, jazz, classical, and non-traditional forms of music such as therapeutic sound baths, and the natural sounds of the park wilderness. The focus of the book is primarily on music of the people who made the area their home, but also touches on famous musicians who have come to Joshua Tree, to perform, to reflect, to create.

Read more

Description


Living alone at the remote Lost Horse Cabin — beyond the Service Road Only sign, beyond the Locked Gate Ahead sign, beyond the Do Not Enter sign, up the long, winding dirt road flanked by Joshua trees, Mojave yuccas, fields of desert dandelions, occasional stands of purple lupine, blooming cacti, and other desert wildflowers — I spent two weeks as Artist-in-Residence at Joshua Tree National Park in California. This book is the project that resulted from my residency. Songs of Joshua Tree is a work of literary art — using oral history, documented artifacts, and my experience living in the region for several weeks — exploring music over the course of history in the area that now comprises Joshua Tree National Park and its surrounds. During my tenure at the park, I met with descendants of pioneer families and musicians from the three primary Native American tribes that had inhabited the park; I explored the park seeking places and artifacts of musical significance; and I attended local music events. I kept a daily travel journal. Each night I fell asleep to the sound of the wind howling through the park, and awoke in the morning to the who-who, knock-knock-knock of the great horned owl and ladder-backed woodpecker in my yard, which served to underscore that in addition to the music people sang, played, and wrote here, the desert makes its own music. Because there was no Internet connectivity or cell phone reception at the cabin, the lack of digital distractions opened all senses to the desert environment. I felt a heightened awareness of the sounds around me. Here, every sound stands on its own. With no minuscule microphones, and no recording equipment, I recorded the sounds of the desert — both of human musicians and of the landscape itself — in the only way I know: with my words. This book is meant to be neither an exhaustive inventory of every music event nor every song written in the area. It paints the landscape of music that touched and shaped the lives of people here. Each culture brought its own contribution to the history of the park, including music history. Sometimes these groups or individuals influenced each other, but there is not a holistic arc of music progression seen over the course of time; there are pockets of "aha" moments when something in a later era evokes something earlier in history, and there are specific instances of one group borrowing music traditions from another. To a large degree, the progression mirrored what happened musically everywhere in this country, but the specific landscape and events of this desert park contributed a unique slant and mysticism that can only be understood by looking at the physical features of the desert and its oases, and the historic events that took place here.

Read more

About the author


LAUREN BETH EISENBERG DAVIS is a Baltimore-based writer and award-winning photographer. In 2014, she was Artist-in-Residence at Joshua Tree National Park in California. Her prior work has been published in The Baltimore Sun, Avotaynu, Art Times, New Lines from the Old Line State, The Gunpowder Review, Scribble, and Pen in Hand.


You can follow Lauren on:

Website:

https://laurenbetheisenbergdavis.com/home.html


Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/LaurenBethEisenbergDavis/


Goodreads:

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/19324900.Lauren_Beth_Eisenberg_Davis


Read more

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