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Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
  • SubGenre:Environmental Economics
  • Language:English
  • Pages:225
  • eBook ISBN:9781626756236

Empty Tank Empty Wallet

For Those Who Don't Own an Oil Well

by Bill Ferree

Book Image Not Available
Overview
The people of Florida, Massachusetts, Oregon, etc. are paying for the “party goin’ on” in Texas, Oklohoma, North Dakota, etc. Thank goodness electric cars and renewable energy cost less, and are about to take away the punchbowl. It’s none too soon for a world rapidly getting too warm.
Description
The people of Florida, Massachusetts, Oregon, etc. are paying for the “party goin’ on” in Texas, Oklohoma, North Dakota, etc. Thank goodness electric cars and renewable energy cost less, and are about to take away the punchbowl. It’s none too soon for a world rapidly getting too warm. Florida ships away $100 million a day in exchange for motor fuel—and natural gas and coal for its electricity generating plants. Other states, Georgia, New Jersey, Connecticut, and so on, suffer the same disadvantage. Call them red-ink states. They send money to black-ink states, Wyoming, Alaska, Kentucky, etc. the ones that produce fossil fuel, and to Venezuela, Russia ,Saudi Arabia and Canada. The burden will get heavier because oil becomes ever more expensive to extract. A growing, and wealthier, world population competes for the supply. And eventually a carbon penalty will be imposed. The carbon problem is the biggest and may prove the most expensive. The move away from fossil fuels is practical now, but it is held back by inertia and an organized effort to slow it by the entrenched interests that are well rewarded by the status quo. These interests control policy in Washington. This is a wake-up call to red-ink state citizens. You’re bleeding, but your politicians are not coming to your aid. They don’t seem to care about all that money coming out of your pocket. Demand a home-grown fix to your economic hardship, and at the same time start your state on the path to responsible world citizenship on climate change.
About the author
Bill Ferree has a lifelong passion for technology, especially machines that move. His parents first saw obsession with trains. Ferree grew up in farm country, but went away to school and never came back. A degree in mechanical engineering was followed by a tour in the Navy, and then a career as an airline pilot. It was a career powered by fossil fuel. Recent experience has included elected office and membership on a regional transportation planning board. This is the front line where the financial drain of spending for energy constrains the ability to pay for essential public services and infrastructure. Protection of the environmental future is one of the most difficult challenges. Ferree takes seriously his role as a grandfather. He sees it an obligation to pass on to his grandchildren, and to future generations, the best world possible, one with minimal unwanted residue from our time here. This is his organizing principle for life and work. He is optimistic.
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