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About the author


Bunny was born and raised in Greensboro, North Carolina. She resides in Golconda, Illinois.
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Abigail Waits

Overview


Bullying - the word itself brings negative connotations, It doesn't differentiate race, gender or creed. Boundless with its grip and cruelty, the assistance of the internet leads it slithering through homes, schools, cities and countries. Meet Abigail, a victim of bullying, that has hurt her mentally and physically. Hiding in the woods, away from words and hands that can hurt her is her only solace. Hannah, daughter to Cherokee Indian Chief Daniel Littlejohn, is continuing his work, after her father's passing, locating Cherokees that perished deep in a thousand acre tract of woods to reunite them with their ancestors . At midnight is when Hannah enters the woods to be undetected, the forest seems to come alive! Walking by a stream she catches a glimpse of a girl. Hannah calls out and the mysterious girl disappears . "Who is this girl and why is she here?" Running to find her Hannah sees a pair of red eyes glaring in her direction. "Is this what father meant when he warned me about coming into the woods alone?" Abigail watches Hannah.."Why does this Cherokee girl beckon me? Does she mean me harm?" Exiting the woods Hannah decides to seek help, and assemble a team of trusted friends, to brave the unknown dangers. Will time run out for the girl by the stream? The author has taken a mystical tale weaved with characters depicted in Indian folklore to spread a message of hope and kindness for anyone that is a target of cruel behavior. Abigail takes us through the kind of despair where only isolation makes her feel safe. This happens too often in real life. Memorable and heartwarming the authors message is to look beyond someone's nationality, disabilities and beliefs and see the individual for who they are.
Read more

Description


Bullying - the word itself brings negative connotations, it doesn't differentiate race, gender, or creed. Boundless with its grip and cruelty, the assistance of the internet leads it slithering through homes, schools, cities and countries. Abigail becomes a victim, the child of colonists settling in America a skirmish with Indians kills her family. Following the sounds of wails an Indian Chief finds Abigail hiding in a barn and decides to spare her. Removed from the only life she had known to live with a family of another land and race, she finds that this new world is not kind. She feels distrust and suspicions beating down on her because she doesn't look like those around her. A boy decides she is the enemy and charges her with a burning stick, leaving Abigail without an eye, fueling the stares and whispers. Standing bravely, Abigail waits to be selected on a team playing stickball, only to be left alone as others walk away laughing and whispering. Retreating to the woods and sitting by a stream is Abigail's only solace. Abigail's Indian mother Leotie finds her with fever one night and rushes her to the Medicine Man. Despite his best efforts, Abigail dies. The woods and stream are where she felt peace and happy. " No one can hurt me here." Abigail chooses to remain there... In modern day Hannah daughter to Indian Chief Daniel Littlejohn has learned under his tutelage about her heritage. The Trail of Tears, a forced relocation of the Cherokee her father calls The Death March is where so many Indians perished. Chief Littlejohn left the reservation and settled in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his family, devoting his life work to locating Indians that died to give them proper burials. Adjacent to a thousand acre tract of woods is where they call home. Midnight was when Chief Littlejohn felt safe to pass into the woods undetected, as a child Hannah would try to follow."The forest holds many things daughter, I will bring you when you are ready." her father explains. Hannah, grown now continues her father's work after his passing, but is warned a company has bought the land and will tear down the woods. She has to act quickly to locate the Cherokee. Hannah journeys into the woods at midnight, walking by a stream she catches a glimpse of a girl. Is she seeing things? Going deeper in the woods, a sound makes her turn quickly, in front of her is a girl with a scar over one eye! Hannah calls out and the mysterious girl runs away. "Who is this girl and why is she here?" Running to find her, Hannah sees a pair of red eyes glaring in her direction. "Is this what father meant when he warned me about coming into the woods alone?" Abigail watches Hannah, "Why does this Cherokee girl beckon me, does she mean me harm?" exiting the woods Hannah decides to seek help and assembles a team of trusted friends. They have to act quickly braving the unknown dangers. Will time run out for the girl by the stream? The author has taken a mystical tale weaved with characters depicted in Indian folklore to share the message of hope and kindness for anyone that has been a target of cruel behavior. Abigail takes us through the kind of despair where only isolation seems to provide solace. This happens all too often in real life. Memorable and heartwarming the author's message is to look beyond someone's race, nationality, disabilities and beliefs, and see the individual for who they are.
Read more

Overview


Bullying - the word itself brings negative connotations, It doesn't differentiate race, gender or creed. Boundless with its grip and cruelty, the assistance of the internet leads it slithering through homes, schools, cities and countries. Meet Abigail, a victim of bullying, that has hurt her mentally and physically. Hiding in the woods, away from words and hands that can hurt her is her only solace. Hannah, daughter to Cherokee Indian Chief Daniel Littlejohn, is continuing his work, after her father's passing, locating Cherokees that perished deep in a thousand acre tract of woods to reunite them with their ancestors . At midnight is when Hannah enters the woods to be undetected, the forest seems to come alive! Walking by a stream she catches a glimpse of a girl. Hannah calls out and the mysterious girl disappears . "Who is this girl and why is she here?" Running to find her Hannah sees a pair of red eyes glaring in her direction. "Is this what father meant when he warned me about coming into the woods alone?" Abigail watches Hannah.."Why does this Cherokee girl beckon me? Does she mean me harm?" Exiting the woods Hannah decides to seek help, and assemble a team of trusted friends, to brave the unknown dangers. Will time run out for the girl by the stream? The author has taken a mystical tale weaved with characters depicted in Indian folklore to spread a message of hope and kindness for anyone that is a target of cruel behavior. Abigail takes us through the kind of despair where only isolation makes her feel safe. This happens too often in real life. Memorable and heartwarming the authors message is to look beyond someone's nationality, disabilities and beliefs and see the individual for who they are.

Read more

Description


Bullying - the word itself brings negative connotations, it doesn't differentiate race, gender, or creed. Boundless with its grip and cruelty, the assistance of the internet leads it slithering through homes, schools, cities and countries. Abigail becomes a victim, the child of colonists settling in America a skirmish with Indians kills her family. Following the sounds of wails an Indian Chief finds Abigail hiding in a barn and decides to spare her. Removed from the only life she had known to live with a family of another land and race, she finds that this new world is not kind. She feels distrust and suspicions beating down on her because she doesn't look like those around her. A boy decides she is the enemy and charges her with a burning stick, leaving Abigail without an eye, fueling the stares and whispers. Standing bravely, Abigail waits to be selected on a team playing stickball, only to be left alone as others walk away laughing and whispering. Retreating to the woods and sitting by a stream is Abigail's only solace. Abigail's Indian mother Leotie finds her with fever one night and rushes her to the Medicine Man. Despite his best efforts, Abigail dies. The woods and stream are where she felt peace and happy. " No one can hurt me here." Abigail chooses to remain there... In modern day Hannah daughter to Indian Chief Daniel Littlejohn has learned under his tutelage about her heritage. The Trail of Tears, a forced relocation of the Cherokee her father calls The Death March is where so many Indians perished. Chief Littlejohn left the reservation and settled in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his family, devoting his life work to locating Indians that died to give them proper burials. Adjacent to a thousand acre tract of woods is where they call home. Midnight was when Chief Littlejohn felt safe to pass into the woods undetected, as a child Hannah would try to follow."The forest holds many things daughter, I will bring you when you are ready." her father explains. Hannah, grown now continues her father's work after his passing, but is warned a company has bought the land and will tear down the woods. She has to act quickly to locate the Cherokee. Hannah journeys into the woods at midnight, walking by a stream she catches a glimpse of a girl. Is she seeing things? Going deeper in the woods, a sound makes her turn quickly, in front of her is a girl with a scar over one eye! Hannah calls out and the mysterious girl runs away. "Who is this girl and why is she here?" Running to find her, Hannah sees a pair of red eyes glaring in her direction. "Is this what father meant when he warned me about coming into the woods alone?" Abigail watches Hannah, "Why does this Cherokee girl beckon me, does she mean me harm?" exiting the woods Hannah decides to seek help and assembles a team of trusted friends. They have to act quickly braving the unknown dangers. Will time run out for the girl by the stream? The author has taken a mystical tale weaved with characters depicted in Indian folklore to share the message of hope and kindness for anyone that has been a target of cruel behavior. Abigail takes us through the kind of despair where only isolation seems to provide solace. This happens all too often in real life. Memorable and heartwarming the author's message is to look beyond someone's race, nationality, disabilities and beliefs, and see the individual for who they are.

Read more

Book details

Genre:JUVENILE FICTION

Subgenre:Social Issues / Bullying

Language:English

Pages:44

Format:Paperback

eBook ISBN:9781543984439

Paperback ISBN:9781543984422


Overview


Bullying - the word itself brings negative connotations, It doesn't differentiate race, gender or creed. Boundless with its grip and cruelty, the assistance of the internet leads it slithering through homes, schools, cities and countries. Meet Abigail, a victim of bullying, that has hurt her mentally and physically. Hiding in the woods, away from words and hands that can hurt her is her only solace. Hannah, daughter to Cherokee Indian Chief Daniel Littlejohn, is continuing his work, after her father's passing, locating Cherokees that perished deep in a thousand acre tract of woods to reunite them with their ancestors . At midnight is when Hannah enters the woods to be undetected, the forest seems to come alive! Walking by a stream she catches a glimpse of a girl. Hannah calls out and the mysterious girl disappears . "Who is this girl and why is she here?" Running to find her Hannah sees a pair of red eyes glaring in her direction. "Is this what father meant when he warned me about coming into the woods alone?" Abigail watches Hannah.."Why does this Cherokee girl beckon me? Does she mean me harm?" Exiting the woods Hannah decides to seek help, and assemble a team of trusted friends, to brave the unknown dangers. Will time run out for the girl by the stream? The author has taken a mystical tale weaved with characters depicted in Indian folklore to spread a message of hope and kindness for anyone that is a target of cruel behavior. Abigail takes us through the kind of despair where only isolation makes her feel safe. This happens too often in real life. Memorable and heartwarming the authors message is to look beyond someone's nationality, disabilities and beliefs and see the individual for who they are.

Read more

Description


Bullying - the word itself brings negative connotations, it doesn't differentiate race, gender, or creed. Boundless with its grip and cruelty, the assistance of the internet leads it slithering through homes, schools, cities and countries. Abigail becomes a victim, the child of colonists settling in America a skirmish with Indians kills her family. Following the sounds of wails an Indian Chief finds Abigail hiding in a barn and decides to spare her. Removed from the only life she had known to live with a family of another land and race, she finds that this new world is not kind. She feels distrust and suspicions beating down on her because she doesn't look like those around her. A boy decides she is the enemy and charges her with a burning stick, leaving Abigail without an eye, fueling the stares and whispers. Standing bravely, Abigail waits to be selected on a team playing stickball, only to be left alone as others walk away laughing and whispering. Retreating to the woods and sitting by a stream is Abigail's only solace. Abigail's Indian mother Leotie finds her with fever one night and rushes her to the Medicine Man. Despite his best efforts, Abigail dies. The woods and stream are where she felt peace and happy. " No one can hurt me here." Abigail chooses to remain there... In modern day Hannah daughter to Indian Chief Daniel Littlejohn has learned under his tutelage about her heritage. The Trail of Tears, a forced relocation of the Cherokee her father calls The Death March is where so many Indians perished. Chief Littlejohn left the reservation and settled in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his family, devoting his life work to locating Indians that died to give them proper burials. Adjacent to a thousand acre tract of woods is where they call home. Midnight was when Chief Littlejohn felt safe to pass into the woods undetected, as a child Hannah would try to follow."The forest holds many things daughter, I will bring you when you are ready." her father explains. Hannah, grown now continues her father's work after his passing, but is warned a company has bought the land and will tear down the woods. She has to act quickly to locate the Cherokee. Hannah journeys into the woods at midnight, walking by a stream she catches a glimpse of a girl. Is she seeing things? Going deeper in the woods, a sound makes her turn quickly, in front of her is a girl with a scar over one eye! Hannah calls out and the mysterious girl runs away. "Who is this girl and why is she here?" Running to find her, Hannah sees a pair of red eyes glaring in her direction. "Is this what father meant when he warned me about coming into the woods alone?" Abigail watches Hannah, "Why does this Cherokee girl beckon me, does she mean me harm?" exiting the woods Hannah decides to seek help and assembles a team of trusted friends. They have to act quickly braving the unknown dangers. Will time run out for the girl by the stream? The author has taken a mystical tale weaved with characters depicted in Indian folklore to share the message of hope and kindness for anyone that has been a target of cruel behavior. Abigail takes us through the kind of despair where only isolation seems to provide solace. This happens all too often in real life. Memorable and heartwarming the author's message is to look beyond someone's race, nationality, disabilities and beliefs, and see the individual for who they are.

Read more

About the author


Bunny was born and raised in Greensboro, North Carolina. She resides in Golconda, Illinois.

Read more


Book Reviews

to submit a book review
Bunny
A Powerful Story! Reviewed by K.C. Finn for Readers' Favorite Abigail Waits is a short story on the theme of social issues relating to children and young adults, and was penned by author Bunny Lee. Centered on the theme of bullying, this interesting and cross-cultural tale takes on the genre of a Native American folklore-styled story to get its moral message across, like a modern-day , intelligent fairy tale. The central characters are the titular Abigail, whose history of mental and physical bullying has caused her to run to the woods where no person can hurt her, and Cherokee daughter Hannah who is trying to continue her deceased father's work.What follows is a chilling tale of discovery with a deep emotional heart. Author Bunny Lee has created a superb modern-day fable about the dangers and effects of bullying which young adults and middle-grade readers are sure to enjoy. I particularly love the social issues tales that take on more of a genre and show their meaning through talented storytelling, and that's exactly what happens in this tale of despair and heartache, but eventually healing and hope for the future. The descriptive work of the forest as a setting is top-notch and atmospheric throughout, whilst dialogue really brings these two distinct girls to life and renders their connection palpable as Hannah discovers and learns about the strange girl in the woods. Culturally speaking, it's important and refreshing to see Native American culture represented so well in modern YA fiction. All of this makes Abigail Waits an essential and enjoyable read for anyone looking to expand their perspective on bullying. Read more
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