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We found 50 results for “MANSER”

Full ImagePreview ImageEphesians: Word Come Alive by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/ephesiansWord Come Alive: •is an expanded translation of the New Testament of the Bible by respected editor Martin Manser •supplies linking phrases and background information in italics within the text to help make its message more immediately understandable •aims to express the sense of the original in contemporary, natural English that will have a powerful effect on readers, with a fresh, incisive quality that will make readers sit up and think. Who is behind Word Come Alive? Martin Manser, a professional reference-book editor. He has compiled or edited more than 200 reference books, particularly Bible-reference titles, English-language dictionaries and business-skills books. He is also a Language Trainer and Consultant with national and international companies and organisations. I and my reviewers have worked from and checked my text against United Bible Societies' 4th edition/26th and 27th editions of Novum Testamentum Graece Greek New Testament (Nestle-Aland) as well as other English translations. My reviewers are respected NT authorities: Dr Gervais Angel, formerly NT Greek Examiner for the Church of England and tutor in NT Greek, Trinity College, Bristol, England. and Dr Pieter Lalleman, Tutor in Biblical Studies, Spurgeons College, London, England. Who is 'Word Come Alive' aimed at? 1 Christians who are so familiar with the language of the Bible that it has little or no impact on them, but who want to maintain a living relationship with Jesus Christ. I want such readers of the WCA to then go back to their NIV, ESV, NLT, KJV or NKJV to see what that says. 2 Readers without a knowledge of the Bible but who want to understand its message. Features of 'Word Come Alive': an extended translation (paraphrase) of the New Testament 1 Additional explanatory phrases in italics. For example, Ephesians 2:4-7: But God – what marvellous words these are: 'but God'! God intervened in this desperate situation simply because of who he is. He is infinitely rich in mercy, so he did not deal with us as we deserve. As a result of his great love, with which he loved us, he made us spiritually alive together with Christ. Because we are joined to Christ, God brought us to a new spiritual birth and into a living relationship with him. God made us alive, even when we were spiritually dead because we disobeyed him. You've been rescued only because of his grace – his kind love, his generous favour, that gives us life that we don't deserve in the slightest. Stop and reflect on this: you and I have been rescued from slavery to sin, God's just anger and death. We're now alive to God because we've been brought into a living relationship with God through Jesus Christ – and all this is only because of God's incredible love. Even more than this: God raised us up from spiritual death to life together with Christ. He has seated us securely together with him right now in the heavenly realms in Christ Jesus. At this very moment, we are enjoying the Father's glorious presence together with Christ! God's purpose in doing this was that he might showcase into the distant reaches of time the extravagant wealth of his generous love which is displayed in his kindness towards us in Christ Jesus. What glorious, marvellous privileges are ours in Christ! 2 Natural, contemporary informal English. For example, Ephesians 2:8: Now I'm going to explain God's great rescue operation, his salvation. How were you saved? By grace, only because of God's generous favour, his kind love. As regards our salvation, we bring nothing to the table, absolutely nothing. How then did you make this salvation your own? Through faith. We respond to God through faith. Faith is confident trust in God; it is depending on him. We gratefully receive what he has done for us in Christ. And this salvation is not the result of your own initiative but is God's gift to you. It becomes yours when you simply receive it from God.eBook
Full ImagePreview Image1, 2 & 3 John: Word Come Alive by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/1,-2-and-3-johnWord Come Alive: • is an expanded translation of the New Testament of the Bible by respected editor Martin Manser • supplies linking phrases and background information in italics within the text to help make its message more immediately understandable • aims to express the sense of the original in contemporary, natural English • aims to have a powerful effect on readers, with a fresh, incisive quality that will make readers sit up and think. Who is behind 'Word Come Alive'? Martin Manser, a professional reference-book editor. He has compiled or edited more than 200 reference books, particularly Bible-reference titles, English-language dictionaries and business-skills books. He is also a Language Trainer and Consultant with national and international companies and organisations. Who is 'Word Come Alive' aimed at? 1 Christians who are so familiar with the language of the Bible that it has little or no impact on them, but who want to maintain a living relationship with Jesus Christ. I want such readers of the WCA to then go back to their NIV, ESV, NLT, KJV or NKJV to see what that says. 2 Readers without a knowledge of the Bible but who want to understand its message. Features of 'Word Come Alive': an extended translation (paraphrase) of the New Testament 1 Additional explanatory phrases in italics. For example, 1 John 3:1-3: Stop and look at the amazing love the Father has lavished on us! He has poured his love into our lives so generously. Let the wonderful reality of the Father's love for you impress itself deeply into your being. He has taken the initiative to call us the children of God. Just think: we are his own dear children! Remember that is who we are at this very moment. The reason why people do not recognise us as God's children is that they did not know him. Dear friends, we are the children of God right now. What we will be like is not yet fully clear to us, but what is absolutely clear is this: we know that when Christ appears at his return, we will be like him, because we will see him. Yes, you and I will actually see Christ! We will see him as he really is. Everyone – every child of God – who has such a hope in Christ's glorious return makes themselves pure, just as he is pure. They will keep themselves inwardly clean, removing anything that conflicts with what Christ is like. 2 Natural, contemporary informal English. For example, 3 John 9: I have written a letter of instruction to the church, but one of the leaders, a man named Diotrephes, will have nothing to do with us. He refuses to welcome us and does not recognise our authority. He is intent on being in the limelight all the time. He's power-crazy and likes throwing his weight around. Martin Manser and his reviewers have worked from and checked his text against United Bible Societies' 4th edition/26th and 27th editions of Novum Testamentum Graece Greek New Testament (Nestle-Aland) as well as other English translations. Martin Manser's reviewers are respected New Testament authorities: Dr Gervais Angel, formerly New Testament Greek Examiner for the Church of England and tutor in New Testament Greek, Trinity College, Bristol, England and Dr Pieter Lalleman, Tutor in Biblical Studies, Spurgeons College, London, England.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageLuke's Gospel: Word Come Alive by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/lukes-gospelAre you so familiar with the Bible text of your preferred version that it no longer speaks to you powerfully? Do you want to explore the message of the New Testament? Then this fresh, expanded translation of the New Testament (Word Come Alive) is for you. Respected Bible editor Martin Manser has included helpful phrases and background in italics within the text. The result is an insightful translation that expresses the original in contemporary, natural English which will encourage you to respond to the good news of Jesus. Sample text: Luke 2:1-7 At that time, Emperor Augustus issued an executive order that a census should be taken of the whole known world. The census was conducted so that the people who were registered would have to pay taxes. This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria. So everyone was required to go back to their own home town to be registered. Joseph therefore also went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee and travelled a long way to the little village of Bethlehem (Davids home town) in Judea, because he came from Davids family line. Joseph went with Mary to be registered there. Mary was legally promised in marriage to him and she was expecting a child. While they were there, she went into labour. She gave birth to a son, her first child, with the rights of the firstborn son. She wrapped him in long strips of cloth and placed him gently in a feeding trough used by cattle, because there was no room that provided shelter. The Son of God was born in the most humble circumstances. Luke 15:25-32 But the elder son was out working in the field, and as he came close to home, he could hear music and dancing as he caught the smell of roast veal wafting through the air. He called one of the servants and demanded to know what was going on. The servant told him, Your brothers come home, and your father has killed the fattened calf because hes got him back safe and sound. But the elder son resented his fathers extravagant love and that he had forgiven the younger son so easily. The elder son became angry at the fuss being made of the younger son and refused to go in and join the party. So his father went out, came alongside him and kept on urging him to come in. But full of smug contempt, he answered his father, Look, I feel Ive been unfairly treated! After all, Ive been slaving my guts out dutifully for you for so many years. Ive been careful enough to have never once disobeyed any of your orders. Yet during all that time youve never rewarded me by giving me what I deserve. Youve never even given me a young goat so that I could celebrate with my friends. But when this precious son of yours turns up out of the blue, after using up your inheritance on prostitutes, you kill the fattened calf for him! Then the father responded tenderly to the elder brother, My dear son, you are always with me. Youve been with me all the time. Everything I have is yours. All the privileges of being my son have always been yours to enjoy. But we had to celebrate and be full of joy, because it is your brother – my son – who was dead and is now alive again. He was lost but now has been found.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageJohn's Gospel: Word Come Alive by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/johns-gospelWord Come Alive: • is an expanded translation (paraphrase) of the New Testament of the Bible by respected editor Martin Manser • supplies linking phrases and background information in italics within the text to help make its message more immediately understandable • aims to express the sense of the original in contemporary, natural English • aims to have a powerful effect on readers, with a fresh, incisive quality that will make readers sit up and think. Who is behind Word Come Alive? Martin Manser, a professional reference-book editor. He has compiled or edited more than 200 reference books, particularly Bible-reference titles, English-language dictionaries and business-skills books. He is also a Language Trainer and Consultant with national and international companies and organisations. Who is Word Come Alive aimed at? 1 Christians who are so familiar with the language of the Bible that it has little or no impact on them, but who want to maintain a living relationship with Jesus Christ. I want such readers of WCA to then go back to their NIV, ESV, NLT, KJV or NKJV to see what that says. 2 Readers without a knowledge of the Bible but who want to understand its message. Features of Word Come Alive: an extended translation (paraphrase) of the New Testament 1 Additional explanatory phrases shown in the actual text in italics John 13:10 Jesus explained: 'If you go out for a meal, you have a bath before you go, so that when you arrive, you only need to wash your feet; your whole body is already clean. In the same way, once you've been cleansed and put right with me and have had your sins forgiven, you don't need to keep washing your whole body. That washing is a once-for-all action when you first come to trust in me. After that, you only need to keep washing your feet, that is, to keep receiving fresh forgiveness for the dirt of the sins you pick up day by day. And most of you have been washed clean and share in my salvation, though not all of you.' 2 Background to a passage John 8:6 A tense silence came over the whole group. What would Jesus do? How would he respond? Would he side with the chief priests and Pharisees and stone her, so not forgiving her? Or would he agree with the ordinary people and release her, so setting aside the law? Jesus then did something strange that captured the attention of everyone present. Rather than answer his accusers directly, he bent down and began to use his finger to write in the dust. 3 The rich meaning of key passages John 8:12 Jesus spoke once more to the people, 'The whole world is in darkness, but I give light to everyone. I am the light of the world. If you walk with me through life, trusting me and following my example, you won't stumble along in the gloom. No, I lift the darkness. My light will shine on you to guide you. I will light up your path and show you the right way to live. You will then be able to see the way ahead clearly and know where you're going.' 4 Natural, contemporary informal English John 16:8 'When the Mentor comes in fresh power he will impress on the hearts of those who are hostile to me that they've been wrong about sin, about what is right and about judgment.' I and my reviewers have worked from and checked my text against United Bible Societies' 4th edition/26th and 27th editions of Novum Testamentum Graece Greek New Testament (Nestle-Aland) as well as other English translations. My reviewers are respected NT authorities: Dr Gervais Angel, formerly NT Greek Examiner for the Church of England and tutor in NT Greek, Trinity College, Bristol, England, and Dr Pieter Lalleman, Tutor of New Testament, Spurgeons College, London, England.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageCrossword Companion by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/crossword-companionThe solving of crossword puzzles is a kind of aerobics for the little grey cells. It puts one's mental suppleness to the test, it taxes the staying power of one's vocabulary, it usually produces no immediate reward, but completing the exercise gives a satisfying feeling of achievement. A fascination with words – their multiplicity, variety, oddity, their slippery ambiguity and their often chameleon-like ability to change – lurks within many people even if they have no reason to use words other than straightforwardly in their ordinary lives. It provides guidance on: Quick crosswords Cryptic crosswords Clues and cues Anagrams Anagram cues Other cryptic devices This book is intended to provide basic assistance to anyone who needs help in solving a crossword clue. In the first instance it offers a range of words of equivalent meaning, synonyms, for many common terms. Since almost all crossword clues come with an indication of the number of the letters forming the answer, the basic principle of organization in the book is based on the number of letters in any given word. This applies not only to all lists of synonyms, but to the majority of longer lists of things. For greater clarity, where words have several different functions and different meanings, the synonyms are divided up in accordance with the different senses, so that a typical entry looks like this: game I n 1 (4) play; (5) sport; (7) pastime; (9) amusement; (10) recreation; 2 (5) event, match, round; (6) partie; (7) contest; 3 animals hunted for sport; II adj 1 (5) eager; ready; (6) willing; (5) cross-reference to brave, plucky; (8) spirited. 'Game' is used as both a noun and an adjective. Roman numerals in bold type (I, II etc) separate off the different parts of speech. Arabic numerals in bold (1, 2, 3) separate off the various senses in which a word may be used in a particular part of speech. This subdivision is not too hard and fast, for, as noted above, crosswords depend on the ability of words to possess different meanings and operate as different parts of speech. For reasons of space, it is not always possible to give all the possible synonyms at every entry. If the word 'game' is used as or in a clue, the answer will quite often be the name of a particular game. The main entry only contains synonyms for the generic term 'game'. The names of specific games are given in a list following the main entry. The book also notes words that are frequently used as cryptic 'cues'. Where a word is often used cryptically, its cryptic function is indicated in a separate subsection headed by a Roman numeral at the end of the main entry. Where the reader encounters the notes cryptic ANAGRAM CUE or cryptic HIDDEN WORD CUE, he or she is directed to the relevant section of the introduction. Further, the book contains many notes and lists featuring general-knowledge information. The name of, for instance, a Greek or Roman god or a Shakespearean character may be asked for or alluded to in a clue. What counts as general cultural property that a solver can reasonably be expected to possess changes as time goes on, and we may be felt to err on the conservative side in what we offer here, but it reflects what we have found one is usually expected to know about when tackling mainstream crosswords. This book will be a useful aid to everyone who needs help in solving crossword clues.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImagePhilippians: Word Come Alive by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/philippiansWord Come Alive: •is an expanded translation of the New Testament of the Bible by respected editor Martin Manser •supplies linking phrases and background information in italics within the text to help make its message more immediately understandable •aims to express the sense of the original in contemporary, natural English that will have a powerful effect on readers, with a fresh, incisive quality that will make readers sit up and think. Who is behind Word Come Alive? Martin Manser, a professional reference-book editor. He has compiled or edited more than 200 reference books, particularly Bible-reference titles, English-language dictionaries and business-skills books. He is also a Language Trainer and Consultant with national and international companies and organisations. He and his reviewers have worked from and checked his text against United Bible Societies' 4th edition/26th and 27th editions of Novum Testamentum Graece Greek New Testament (Nestle-Aland) as well as other English translations. His reviewers are respected NT authorities: Dr Gervais Angel, formerly NT Greek Examiner for the Church of England and tutor in NT Greek, Trinity College, Bristol, England and Dr Pieter Lalleman, Tutor in Biblical Studies, Spurgeons College, London, England. Who is 'Word Come Alive' aimed at? 1 Christians who are so familiar with the language of the Bible that it has little or no impact on them, but who want to maintain a living relationship with Jesus Christ. I want such readers of the WCA to then go back to their NIV, ESV, NLT, KJV or NKJV to see what that says. 2 Readers without a knowledge of the Bible but who want to understand its message. 'Word Come Alive' is written in natural, contemporary informal English, with additional explanatory phrases in italics in the actual text. For example, Philippians 2:2-5: I appeal to you to fill me with joy by all 'singing from the same hymnsheet', loving one another, working peacefully together, one in heart and soul and focusing on the good news of Christ. I urge you to examine your motives. Never do anything out of rivalry or arrogant self-interest; don't be conceited. Instead, be humble, valuing others as more important than yourselves. Don't keep asking, 'What's in it for me?' all the time; instead also, each one of you, consider the interests of other people. In your relationships with one another, you should always express the same attitude as Christ Jesus had. Philippians 4:10-13: I was immensely delighted in the Lord that your kind concern for me eventually blossomed afresh. I appreciate the fact that you were concerned for me all along, but I realise you lacked the opportunity to express your concern. Please don't misunderstand me. I'm not writing this because I feel hard done by and am in need. No; I've learnt the secret of being content in whatever circumstances I find myself. I know from experience what it is not to have enough and I know what it is to have more than enough. My contentment doesn't depend on my circumstances, you see. I've come to learn the secret of being content in any – yes, every – situation, whether I'm full to bursting or I'm faint from lack of food, whether I'm living in the lap of luxury or I've not got two pennies to rub together. I am content whatever my circumstances and can do all his will through Christ, who gives me his dynamic energy. Christ is the source of my strength: his power equips me to face life's challenges.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful Verbs and Tenses by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-verbs-and-tensesVerbs and tenses are one of the most difficult parts of the English language for learners. There seem to be so many different tenses and structures that are not simple. I have compiled this book to help make verbs easier to understand. The book is in five parts: Chapter 1 The basics Here we look at the main terms used to describe different kinds of verb, eg transitive and intransitive. Chapter 2 Tenses In this section, we explain the wide range of tenses in English, as in for example I work, I am working, I worked, I have worked, I had worked, I will have worked. This section ends with a summary of the different tenses. Chapters 3-13 Other kinds of verb Here we consider other kinds of verb: auxiliaries (eg do, can, may); questions and negatives; the passive (eg The car was driven by Daniel); conditionals (with if); phrasal verbs, eg break down, make up; the infinitive; participles; reported speech; and the subjunctive. Chapter 14 Useful verbs Here we look at some common verbs (eg come, do, make go, put, set) and their phrasal verbs, together with their definitions and examples of usage. Chapter 15 Irregular verbs A list of irregular verbs in English. Additional features throughout the book include 'Grammar extra' panels with further useful information, eg the different words that go with do and make, the difference between been and gone and between bring and take and different words to use instead of say. Cross-references guide you to relevant information in other locations in the text. I hope this short book will not only increase your understanding but also improve your use of English verbs.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful William Shakespeare by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-william-shakespeareWilliam Shakespeare's standing as one of the great writers in the English language is universally recognized and unlikely to be seriously challenged now or in the foreseeable future. Although relatively little is known for certain about his life and personal beliefs, and only little more about the circumstances in which he wrote his celebrated plays and poetry, his influence upon literature, language and the wider culture remains profound and far-reaching. The emotional power of Shakespeare's language combined with the originality of his plots and the strength of his characterization has ensured the continuing popularity of his plays with succeeding generations of readers and theatre-goers. The work of a practical man of the theatre, the thirty-six or so tragedies, comedies, tragic-comedies, romances and histories credited to Shakespeare's name continue to be widely performed four hundred years after their creator's death. Even today theatre directors around the world continue to contrive new interpretations of his dramas, finding new ways to keep the stories exciting and relevant to contemporary audiences. As his fellow-playwright and friend Ben Jonson observed in his famous epitaph for Shakespeare, 'He was not of an age but for all time.' All this is despite the sometimes archaic Elizabethan phraseology and imagery that pepper the texts, alongside references to customs and traditions long since fallen into disuse. The meaning of many of the words in Shakespeare's lexicon is no longer immediately familiar and texts are often accompanied by glossaries explaining more obscure terms. Other words that were actually coined by the author have long since been absorbed into the language, testament to the unique literary legacy the man himself left.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful Thesaurus of English by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-thesaurus-of-englishThis thesaurus is aimed chiefly at those who are taking their first steps in learning the English language or who are trying to improve a basic grasp of the language. Most of the words listed here are commonly used by English speakers, both in writing and in daily conversation. English has a rich vocabulary and it is sometimes difficult to know which word to use. Often a single word has several meanings, which vary slightly from each other or which refer to completely different things. Sometimes, when speaking or writing, you may find you have used a particular word several times already and you want to find another word for the same thing. This is where a thesaurus can be helpful. Users of this thesaurus will find several alternatives are listed for each word. Where a particular word has a number of possible meanings these are numbered, beginning with a sample phrase to make clear what the particular meaning is. Each entry ends, where appropriate, with a short list of words (labelled OPPOSITE) that have the opposite meaning. The following example illustrates how entries in this thesaurus are arranged: open 1 the door is open undone, unlocked, unfastened, ajar OPPOSITE: shut, closed, fastened 2 be open with someone frank, honest, candid, straight, direct OPPOSITE: reserved, secretive 3 open to attack vulnerable, susceptible, exposed OPPOSITE: protected, invulnerableeBook
Full ImagePreview ImageDictionary of Eponyms by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/dictionary-of-eponymsThis book explores an aspect of the rich heritage of the English language – the deriving of words from the names of people, eg sandwich, wellington, mackintosh, ampere, watt, volt. Eponyms are the people who give their names to words. Most eponymous words derive from a person's surname: boycott, from the Irish landlord Captain Charles Cunningham Boycott, dahlia, from the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl, the sousaphone, from the American bandmaster John Philip Sousa, and volt, from the Italian physicist Count Alessandro Volta. Some eponymous words come from literary, biblical, or mythological sources: malapropism, from Mrs Malaprop in Sheridan's The Rivals, Dickensian – for example, a real old-fashioned Dickensian Christmas – from the English writer Charles Dickens, as old as Methuselah, from the age of the Old Testament patriarch, and aphrodisiac, from the Greek goddess of love and beauty Aphrodite. In this book, I have concentrated on the more well-known eponymous words in general use and have sought to give background detail on interesting aspects of an individual's life. The entries are listed according to the name of the thing referred to, not the name the thing derives from. So there is an entry spoonerism, which shows the derivation Rev William Archibald Spooner. Note that when the name of the thing itself is a person's name this is listed in alphabetical order: e.g. an Aunt Sally is listed at Aunt, Mrs Grundy at Grundy, and a smart alec at smart.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful Jane Austen by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-jane-austenJane Austen ranks high among the most loved of all English writers. In contrast to many other celebrated authors her reputation rests upon a relatively small output, of around half a dozen major novels and a few other fragments, but her lasting influence upon the subsequent development of the English novel is undisputable nonetheless. Austen's own life was one of upper middle-class rural gentility and this is the orderly, prosperous and close-knit world that is depicted in her writing, which deals almost exclusively with the personal relationships and social entanglements of characters sharing a similarly refined country background. It was a small canvas upon which she chose to work but it allowed her to focus upon her characters in minute detail and to bring them fully and delightfully to life. Although her talent as a novelist was not widely remarked upon during her own lifetime, with one or two notable exceptions, Austen has since been justly praised both for her delicate rendering of character and for her close observation of the social milieu she took as the subject of her greatest works. Over the years, many critics have waxed lyrical about the 'Austen touch', an elusive descriptive term that attempts to draw together the different strands of Jane Austen's style. Prominent features of her writing include great elegance, balance and sensitivity, as well as subtlety of tone and effect and a gentle, ironic wit, which prevents her stories descending into sentiment, as they might easily have done in the hands of a less accomplished stylist.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful Grammar of English by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-grammar-of-englishThis introduction to English grammar is aimed equally at those who are taking first steps in learning English and at native speakers or who are trying to improve a basic grasp of the grammatical rules that underpin the English language. It is grammar that gives any language its character and its practical usefulness, and an understanding of grammatical rules and conventions is as important as mastery of the vocabulary to achieve any degree of fluency. English has a complex grammar and it is sometimes difficult to know which form of words to use. Sometimes the rules are logical and predictable, but on many occasions words do not behave as they might be expected to. Furthermore, often the speaker or writer must choose between two equally acceptable alternatives, the correct use of which depends entirely upon the context or the degree of formality involved. What may be acceptable in everyday conversation, for instance, may not be so acceptable when written down. Knowing how to choose the best option is where a guide like this one can prove indispensable. The text of this book is subdivided into sections comprising several units, each of which tackles a potentially problematic aspect of English grammar. Care has been taken in each unit to explain the topic in simple terms and with numerous examples illustrating how the rules of grammar are applied in real life. Where useful, additional information is added in boxes under the heading Grammar Extra. Cross-references guide the reader to relevant information elsewhere in the text.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageDictionary of Bible Themes by Martin H. Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/dictionary-of-bible-themesDo you want to know your Bible better? This innovative dictionary of the Bible will guide you through its central themes, such as God, Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit, sin and salvation, the church, suffering, hope, and eternal life. You will gain a full and fresh appreciation of the richness of the Bible. This unique and comprehensive topical dictionary covers over 2,000 themes, giving explanations, key Bible references, and cross-references to related themes. Produced by the highly respected editorial team of Martin H. Manser, Alister E. McGrath, J. I. Packer, Donald J. Wiseman, J. Gordon McConville, and Stephen H. Travis. The study of the Bible lies at the heart of the Christian faith. It is therefore important that readers of the Bible are given every means of help so that they may get as much benefit and enjoyment as possible out of reading the Bible. The Dictionary of Bible Themes is designed to allow its users to appreciate to the full the unfolding of the unity and richness of the Bible by studying its central themes. What is the Bible all about? The Dictionary of Bible Themes was planned to allow its users to identify and explore the leading themes of Scripture – themes such as God, Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit, the human race, sin and salvation, the Christian life, the church and the hope of glory. This Dictionary identifies these, and many other key themes, and traces them throughout the course of Scripture. The Bible is here allowed to speak for itself, with a minimum of comment and explanation. The approach adopted in this volume allows its users to come into contact directly with Scripture, rather than having to approach it through the views of commentators. The main themes of Scripture are identified, key biblical references are provided and the mutual relationship of themes is set out clearly. Over 2,000 themes detailed in this work cover doctrinal, ethical, historical and cultural subjects. In addition to dealing with the great themes of the Christian message of salvation, the themes thus also deal with practical issues of Christian living. This approach allows a unifying of Christian wisdom, both theological and practical, for the edification of God's people. The thematic approach The approach adopted in this work differs significantly from a more lexical approach found in some older reference works. A thematic approach is based on related ideas; a lexical approach is based on individual words. The difference between them can easily be appreciated by considering the theme of "assurance". A word-based approach would be limited to identifying biblical passages in which words such as "assure" or "assurance" appear. A thematic approach, however, goes far beyond this and explores all the basic elements of the theme. It identifies its basic ideas, its presuppositions and its consequences, in order that the theme in all its fullness can be unfolded to the reader. Thus the material that deals with assurance covers the grounds of assurance (e.g., the knowledge of God, the certainty of his word, the work of the Holy Spirit), the nature of assurance (of a relationship with God, of salvation, of eternal life and a future hope) and the relationship between assurance and the life of faith. An extensive system of indexing and cross-referencing allows the dynamic relationship of the many biblical themes to be understood and further explored. A further advantage of the thematic approach of the Dictionary of Bible Themes is that it can be used with any Bible translation. Although the verse references provided are intended to be illustrative rather than exhaustive, the reader will nevertheless find a wealth of biblical material arranged thematically. The thematic approach will be particularly welcomed by those who are preparing studies or talks on biblical themes and wish to ensure that they have included or referred to the central passages within Scripture. It will enable them to gain an understanding of the overall place of this theme within Scripture and to explore the way in which it relates to other themes. It will also be valued by readers of Scripture who become interested in a biblical passage or theme and wish to follow it through. The Scripture Index which allows readers to see immediately which themes are associated with the passage under study will allow its users to turn to the Bible Themes section and discover other passages of relevance, as well as other biblical themes that cast light on the particular importance of the passage or theme being studied. The thematic study of Scripture is also important in another respect. Tracing the great biblical themes throughout Scripture allows us to appreciate the essential unity of Scripture. As we trace the unfolding of God's purposes of redemption throughout the pages of the Bible, we come to appreciate more fully how Scripture bears witness to the same God and his same purposes throughout the great themes that bind it together. Application of God's word The editors hope that this new work will bring a fresh quality and depth to readers' understanding and grasp of the riches of Scripture. It is a work that has been designed to meet the many needs of God's people in today's world, whether they are individual believers, or a Christian family studying Scripture in the quietness of the home, or preachers preparing to thrill and challenge a congregation with a fresh appreciation of the wonders of God's word. Structure of the Dictionary of Bible Themes The heart of the Dictionary of Bible Themes is the section on Bible Themes: over 2,000 themes covering the key themes of Scripture. Two ways of helping readers find their way into this section are provided: •the Alphabetical List of Themes. This provides a complete listing in one single alphabetical order of all the theme titles. Selective cross-references are also provided for ease of use, e.g., at "anxiety" the reader is directed to "worry" and at "Cephas" to "Peter". •the Scripture Index of Themes. Verses of the Bible are listed and appearing alongside each verse are the themes associated with that particular passage. In each case, the theme name and theme number should be noted and readers should use the theme number to locate the theme in the Thematic Section. Using the Bible Themes section This section contains over 2,000 themes, covering the key themes of Scripture. Themes cross-refer you to the various parts of Scripture at which each theme occurs and are organised under descriptive headings. You can use the resources of the Bible Themes section in a variety of ways to support your Bible study. Classification of themes The editors have given considerable thought to the arrangement and categorisation of themes. Each theme has been assigned a four-digit number, given with the aim of reflecting the theme's core subject matter and allowing both ease of reference and an understanding of the overall place of the theme in Scripture. For example, one major group of themes focuses on "God", another on "Jesus Christ" and another on "sin and salvation". The categorisation is not intended to force a straitjacket upon the biblical material by placing any kind of arbitrary restrictions on it. Indeed, in a number of instances, a theme could have been categorised differently. The classification is simply intended to make the identification and exploration of themes as simple as possible for the benefit of readers. Each theme number consists of four digits. The first digit stands for one of nine main groups of themes: 1000God 2000Jesus Christ 3000Holy Spirit 4000Creation 5000Humanity 6000Sin and salvation 7000God's people 8000The life of the believer 9000Last things Within each of the major groups of themes, themes have been arranged in subcategories. For example, under Jesus Christ 2000 come: 2003Jesus Christ, qualities of 2200Jesus Christ, titles and descriptions of 2300Jesus Christ, ministry and work of 2400Jesus Christ, gospel of 2500Jesus Christ, history of Within each subcategory, general themes are in many instances given first, followed by themes in alphabetical order. For example, under the subcategory 2200Jesus Christ, titles and names of comes first the general theme 2203Jesus Christ, titles and names of followed in alphabetical order by specific names and titles, e.g., 2206Jesus, the Christ 2218Jesus Christ, Son of God 2221Jesus Christ, Son of Man In many cases, themes are of such importance and complexity that they have been divided in logical order into more manageable sections. For example, the theme of "the church" has been divided as follows: 7020church, the 7021church, OT anticipations of 7022church, and Jesus Christ 7023church, and Holy Spirit 7024church, nature and foundations of 7025church, unity and fellowship of 7026church, leadership of 7027church, purpose and mission of 7028church, life of All the themes are listed in alphabetical order in the alphabetical index. Below is a list of the major groups of themes and subcategories: 1000God 1010God, nature and qualities of 1200God, titles and descriptions of 1300God, work of 1400God, knowledge of 1500God, the Trinity 1600Scripture as the word of God 2000Jesus Christ 2003Jesus Christ, qualities of 2200Jesus Christ, titles and descriptions of 2300Jesus Christ, ministry and work of 2400Jesus Christ, gospel of 2500Jesus Christ, history of 3000Holy Spirit 3005Holy Spirit, qualities of 3100Holy Spirit, titles and descriptions of 3200Holy Spirit, ministry and work of 4000Creation 4100Supernatural beings 4200Places 4300Metals and minerals 4400Vegetation and food 4600Living beings 4800Natural and supernatural phenomena 4900Time 5000Humanity 5070Individuals in OT and NT 5125Parts of the body and clothing 5200Human civilisation 5650Human relationships 5760Human attitudes and behaviour 6000Sin and salvation 6010Sin 6100Aspects of sin 6500Salvation 6600Aspects of salvation 7000God's people 7010The church as the people of God 7100Titles of the people of God 7200History of God's people in OT 7300Institutions and culture of OT 7500Jews and Gentiles 7600History of God's people in NT 7700Leadership and the people of God 7900The life of the church 8000The life of the believer 8010Faith 8100The life of faith 8200The character of the believer 8400The tasks of the believer 8600Prayer and worship of the believer 8700Threats to the life of faith 9000Last things 9010Death 9100Aspects of the last things 9200Judgment 9300Resurrection 9400Heaven 9500Hell 9600Hope Extract from alphabetical index of themes Aaron 5071 -- as model priest 5073 -- spokesman for Moses 5072 abandonment 5770 Abba 1250 abiding in Christ 8102 ability See skill 5531 abolition 4906 abomination 6103 Abraham 5075 -- character of 5077 -- life of 5076 -- significance of 5078 Abram See Abraham 5075 abstinence 5771 -- as a discipline 5773 -- from drinking See drinking, abstention from 4436 abundance 4035 abuse 5775 Abyss, the 9520 acceptance 6602 -- divine 6603 -- human 6604 access to God 6606 accountability See responsibility 5051 accusation 5201 -- false 5202 achievement 5776 acquittal 5203 Adam 5080 -- and Jesus Christ 5083 -- creation and life of 5081 -- significance of 5082 addiction 6106 admonition 5777 adoption 6608 -- descriptions of 6610 -- nature of 6609 -- privileges and duties of 6611 -- responsibilities of See adoption, privileges and duties of 6611 adoration 8632 adorning 5778 adultery 6242 -- spiritual 6243 advice 5779 advisers 5780 affection 5781 affliction See suffering 5560 affluence 8701 after-life 9110 agape See love 8292 age 5204 ageing See old age 5725 agnosticism 8702 agony 5782 agreement 5783 agriculture 4406 alertness See watchfulness 8490eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful Charles Dickens by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-charles-dickensCharles Dickens was the most popular writer of his generation and his many novels and short stories are still widely read and enjoyed around the world. To modern readers he occupies an exalted position as perhaps the leading commentator writing in English upon the times in which he lived. Although Dickens did sometimes set his tales in earlier centuries, most of his books were set in contemporary Britain and many of them depict life as experienced by the poorer sections of society. The realism of his depictions of poverty-stricken industrial and urban life were much informed by his own childhood experiences of deprivation long before he established a highly successful literary career as a prolific novelist, magazine editor and performer of his own writings. The plight of his protagonists, not always happily resolved and to modern eyes occasionally melodramatic and sentimental, evoked a deeply emotive response in readers at all levels of society and sometimes served as a key influence in changing social policy. Because many of his novels were written in parts for publication in relatively cheap monthly magazines they became available to a much wider readership that would not normally be able to afford the complete stories in book form. Dickens's great literary reputation is based on many factors but perhaps the most important of these is his unmatched skill at characterization. The hundreds of characters he created include some of the best known in world fiction, and many of them have become icons personifying aspects of flawed humanity. The fact that their stories are typically told with great humour and sympathy and in language that is at once poetic and authentic makes them much more than mere ciphers for social criticism, however. Many decades after the author's death, the term 'Dickensian' still denotes a style that combines biting social observation with strong characterization and convincing descriptive power.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-dictionary-of-phrasal-verbsA phrasal verb is a verb that consists of two or three separate parts: come in, run away, look forward to, etc. With an idiomatic phrasal verb, the meanings of the separate parts tell us little or nothing about the meaning of the whole. For example, students may be fully familiar with the meanings of pick and up as individual words, but this knowledge does not help them when they want to know the idiomatic meaning of pick up in, 'Business is picking up'. This dictionary has been written to help the learner with this type of idiomatic combination. To be fluent in English, you have to be able to use phrasal verbs well. This dictionary has been written for intermediate and advanced students who want an easy-to-use reference book that deals with this area of the language. The emphasis is on idiomatic phrasal verbs, whose meaning and use are especially difficult for students. The Useful Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs has about 2,500 entries, each containing a definition, note on grammatical usage and one or more examples to show how the phrasal verb is actually used. Many new phrasal verbs referring to the world of computers and the Internet – for example log in and scroll down– have been added for this edition. Phrasal verbs are important in English but they are also quite difficult for students to learn. Learners of English need to be able both to recognize them in reading and listening, as well as to be able to use them in writing and speaking.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful Dictionary of English by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-dictionary-of-englishFrom the introduction to the Useful Dictionary of English: This is a dictionary for 'slow learners'. There are many individuals who never want to stop learning, but the process for them is a slow one. I do hope that the user-friendly approach in the page layout will be an encouragement to such a group. This is a dictionary for unconfident readers. Many individuals have lost confidence in reading for a variety of reasons. I do hope they will find this book becomes a guide and stimulates them to start reading again. This is a dictionary for poor spellers. I am told this group is far larger than may at first be imagined. Even professionals need help from time to time in this direction. This is a dictionary for dyslexic friends. Being dyslexic myself I knowing that in all walks of life – from successful businessmen to those involved in the media, from 'celebrities' whose names are unknown outside their immediate circle – being dyslexic is a genuine problem. The thoughtful way that our Designer, Steve Carroll has interpreted the needs of dyslexic people I hope will be a great help. This is a dictionary for children and students. In more recent days, I have enjoyed the privilege of becoming an Ambassador for Birmingham University and expressing my concern for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds who now have an opportunity to move to higher education. Not only that group, but all children and students can benefit from making this Dictionary their regular companion. Of course, there is a whole range of dictionaries which the wise student will make use of – and likewise use them and commend them. But they tend to be 'resource' and 'reference' books. We desire that this "Useful Dictionary" will be a friend for life. This is a dictionary for overseas visitors, those for whom English is a second language, I hope this Dictionary will be of great help. A great deal of thought has gone into this Dictionary and my only regret is that I did not produce it 30 years ago, when I first entered publishing. Robert Hicks, Dyslexic PublishereBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful Dictionary of Verbs With Prepositions by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-dictionary-of-verbs-with-prepositionsStudents of English often have difficulties knowing which preposition goes with a particular verb. Do you know which preposition to use with the following verbs: accuse of or for? depend on or at? escape from or off? include in or into? listen to or through? wait for or to? This is where this dictionary will help you. By looking up the verb you will find the preposition, a definition and an example: smile verb smile at turn up the ends of your mouth when you look at (someone) to show you are pleased, happy, amused, etc.: Debbie smiled lovingly at her new baby. Some entries have style markers (formal) or (informal) to help you know the context when to use the verb: protrude verb protrude from (formal) stick out from (somewhere): An umbrella protruded from her bag. sponge verb sponge off or on (informal) get (money, food, etc.) from (someone): Steve's friends are fed up with him sponging off them. Some entries have notes: protest verb protest about or against or at argue against (something); refuse to agree or accept (something): Animal-rights activists have protested against killer-whale shows. Note: the American usage of omitting against is becoming more popular in British English. I protest at the government's actions. The verbs in this dictionary are mostly non-phrasal verbs that are used with certain prepositions. The verbs are usually used in a literal sense. This is different from phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs are verbs used with a preposition or adverb whose meaning cannot be deduced from the meanings of the individual words. It usually has a figurative, or non-literal, meaning. For example, if you walk into a room, you enter a room by walking – that is a non-phrasal verb. If you walk into a job, you get a job easily, without having to make much effort – that is a phrasal verb. This dictionary will help you find the correct preposition where one is needed. It contains about 3000 entries.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageUseful Dictionary of Nouns With Prepositions by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/useful-dictionary-of-nouns-with-prepositionsStudents learning English often have difficulties knowing which preposition goes with a particular noun. This is where this dictionary will help you. It contains about 1,200 entries. By looking up the noun you will find the preposition, a definition and an example: guide n guide to book describing a place or explaining a subject: He was looking in the travel section for a guide to the Algarve. In the above short entry: guide = the headword, the basic noun n = the part of speech guide to = the noun and the correct preposition book describing a place or explaining a subject = the definition of the noun He was looking in the travel section for a guide to the Algarve = an example of the noun as it would typically be used in a sentence, with the noun and preposition in bold type Some entries show prepositions that can come both either before or after the noun: detail n details of small, special items, points, facts, etc. of: The newspaper reported the details of the battle. in detail covering all features of something: I need time to study the proposal in detail. Note that not all possible uses of nouns and prepositions are included. Usages that can be easily deduced from the noun and normal uses of prepositions are excluded. For example, with the noun call, the usages make a phone call to and the call of a bird can be easily worked out from the noun call and the normal use of the prepositions to and of. However, the following are included as they cannot be easily worked out from the noun call and the normal use of the prepositions: call n call for or to need: I dont think theres any call for alarm at this point. Theres no call to worry. call on short visit to: Ill pay a call on her later to see how shes doing. on call available to work if summoned: The doctor was able to go home but had to remain on call that night. Some entries have style markers (formal) or (informal) to help you know the context when to use the adjective: prerequisite n (formal) run-in n (informal) We hope that you will find this dictionary helpful and that it will help you to use English nouns correctly.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageDiscovering God's Way: Practical Encouragement for Following Jesus by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/discovering-god's-wayThere are plenty of people who are willing to tell you how to be a follower of Jesus. And much of their advice can be helpful. But with most things in life – riding a bicycle or playing a musical instrument, for instance – all the advice in the world is not as important as your discovering for yourself how to do something. You have to get on a bicycle and ride or pick up a guitar and strum the strings. It's the same with learning how to be a follower of Jesus. Discovering God's Way will help you to discover for yourself . . . Jesus Christ – his teaching, his actions, his claims, and his death and resurrection. You will also learn about Jesus and the church, and how to make Jesus known. Prayer – what it is, what you should pray for, why it sometimes seems your prayers are not answered, and how to overcome discouragement in prayer Discipleship – how to learn to follow Jesus Christ and what that means for your life – everything from living in the Holy Spirit to practical advice such as how to become involved in God's world. Moving on as a Christian – very practical thoughts about a Christian's priorities in life, in work, and in speech Our prayer is that these studies might help you to discover God's way. But at the end of the day, it's not just a matter of reading about it. You have to do it. Just as you have to get on the bicycle and ride, you have to be a follower of Jesus yourself.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageEncounters with Jesus: New Testament stories in a contemporary setting by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/encounters-with-jesus1Imagine you are Nicodemus, on your way to meet Jesus this evening. What would be going through your mind right now? Or how would you really feel about Jesus if you were John the Baptist … or Pontius Pilate? Let your imagination be ignited as you read these encounters with Jesus in contemporary settings as the individuals themselves might have retold them. Years ago I used to sit at the back of the church to help welcome people to the services and to be available if needs arose during the services. Towards the end of the service, as the talk drew to a close, the preacher would often say, 'Let me tell you a story.' I would see rows of heads immediately lift at this phrase. Everyone loves a good story. A while back I was sitting at my computer – a book was inside me, waiting to burst out. I imagined I was Nicodemus, the man who met Jesus, as recorded in John chapter 3. I'd heard many talks on this passage, how he came to Jesus at night and the conversation that then followed. But I wanted to put the whole episode into a contemporary setting. It was something of an experiment at first – would it work? I'd always imagined I was more of an editor than a writer – and here I was editing the Bible text, or as I put it, thinking aloud. I imagined what might have gone on in Nicodemus' mind as he was about to meet up with Jesus that evening… how he may have avoided a committee meeting, how he had heard about Jesus, what his hopes and fears were. I went back to the Bible text and imagined the situation… he'd rung Jesus from a call box at lunch time… they were due to meet in a new Thai restaurant in town, where people hopefully would not recognize him… what were his thoughts as Jesus talked? and what might have been his response? And then I thought of other New Testament people. In today's setting, might Joseph (husband of Mary, mother of Jesus) have played football with Jesus? Taken him to school? What might it have been like to have been there when Jesus threw the money changers out of the temple? And what about the guard at Jesus' tomb that first Easter Day, as he really wanted to do some DIY? I worked on a few stories, showed them to some friends, who reacted positively, and passed them to Mark Woods, editor of the Baptist Times, who responded enthusiastically and in due course published well over a dozen of these stories. So here we are: encounters that Jesus had with 52 men as recorded in the New Testament, put into contemporary settings as the individuals themselves might have retold them. But is it OK to go beyond the Bible text in this way? Some might argue that we should not distort the Bible text. I would certainly agree with that and I affirm in my own life the regular practice of reading and studying the Bible individually, in small groups and in larger church meetings. But alongside that basic affirmation comes two needs. First, at times in my own personal devotional life I have found that the Bible is no longer speaking clearly to me. I have at times become so familiar with the words that the meaning behind them isn't fresh any more. (On such occasions I have found paraphrases in contemporary English very helpful.) Second, I believe we need a bridge to help us connect the people in the Bible with the people of today. The settings of the Bible stories may have changed, but human character and the human heart hasn't – we still face the same basic fears and have the same joys as many people two thousand years ago. So I believe it is permissible to transfer those stories into contemporary culture. I also believe firmly in the creativity of what we are. Part of being human, being made in the image of God, is this creative aspect of our nature. I believe God gives us permission to think aloud; in his terms thinking is allowed (word play intended!). What themes emerged? One of the key ones was identity: Jesus' sense of identity with his Father, his sense of vocation and mission and his love for individuals. Jesus honoured and respected each person he met as a unique individual. But I didn't expect to find him giving those he met such a completely new sense of identity as well – see doubting Thomas, for example. Another major theme was integrity: Jesus' character and his actions and words were all in harmony with one another in a way that the lives of people he met with (and my own life) often are not. In fact as I wrote the last few (Caiaphas, Herod Antipas, Pilate) -- although I'm a dictionary writer by profession I didn't write them in alphabetical order! -- I was struck by the enormous inconsistencies between these men's public profile and their own personal lives. One further theme was response. Jesus met so many people who were changed by that encounter but there was a deeper question: would they have the courage to respond more publicly and more fully to that encounter? I have in mind two audiences: First, Those unfamiliar with the New Testament record, who perhaps dismiss the validity of Jesus Christ and his claims. Many books have been written on the evidence of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus and I don't want to add to them. Instead I've zeroed in on human character, which hasn't changed in the 2,000 years or so since Jesus walked on earth. I invite you to read these stories and allow Jesus to challenge you. Secondly, those who are familiar with the New Testament. You know the stories, their content and their form. Perhaps you are so familiar with them that they have lost some of their impact. Come with me and transfer these stories to our present-day culture. The main source has been the New Testament record itself. Time and time again I have gone back to that, searching for clues as to the background, comparing one account in one Gospel with the similar record in another Gospel. I've imagined… I've listened to those present and to what they might have been thinking… I've reflected on what goes on in my own life and I've listened to those around me and what people around me are thinking too. (I admit that before I began writing this book, I thought I knew the Gospels quite well. Writing these stories made me realize I didn't as I reread them in detail.) The stories are listed in alphabetical order. Each heading has a Bible passage (or a selection of Bible passages in many instances) if you want to look up the original. At the end of the stories, I've included questions to help you make a response. My ultimate aim in retelling these stories is to see ourselves – our own lives – and to allow Jesus to meet with us. As we encounter Jesus, how are we changed? What is our response to Jesus Christ coming to us? Each one of us is different. Will we join him on our own unique adventure of trusting him?eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageWalking with God: Promises and Prayers from the Bible for Each Day of the Year by Martin Manser | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/walking-with-god1'Walking with God' takes promises and prayers from the Bible and helps you meet with God every day! He is the God of the promises and the One who inspires our prayers. Here you will find not only down-to-earth practical wisdom, but also thought-provoking direction and inspiration for your life today. A plane journey sometimes has its turbulent moments; life too can have its ups and downs. This book has been written out of an absolute conviction that God is with us always, and that his presence can be experienced particularly in such times. God does not want us to separate our spiritual lives from the rest of our life, but to remember he is with us in those times of illness, hardship, bereavement or difficulty – and of course, to know the same in life's joys! The Bible is a rich source of people who have cried out to God in their anguish – or praised him for his loving kindness. The Bible is also full of promises, made to individuals, and which are applicable to us today. 'Walking with God: 365 Promises and prayers from the Bible for every day of the year' takes promises and prayers from the Bible as its daily foundation. The aim is simply to help you meet with God daily! He is the God of the promises. He is the God who inspires our prayers. He is the One we can turn to in every situation in life: when we are puzzled, when we find it difficult to carry on, when we need guidance and help, and when we are just simply grateful. Each day's reading begins with an opening verse from the Bible, which is then considered and applied, and closes with a final Bible verse. Sometimes other Bible extracts are quoted, and every book in the Bible is drawn from over the course of the year, encouraging us to turn to God in every situation in life. If possible, find a quiet place where you can let go of the busyness of life for a few moments and quieten your spirit to be still, to listen and talk to God as you think over and pray about each day's reading.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageIn Retrospect: Autobiographical Remembrances by F.F. Bruce | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/in-retrospectIn Retrospect: Remembrances of Things Past is an intimate self-portrait of the life and times of F.F. Bruce, one of the evangelical world's most beloved and influential biblical scholars. Bruce was significant because in a time when the academic community looked down upon Evangelicals, he demonstrated that worthwhile academic work could be done by an Evangelical. At the same time, he persuaded Evangelicals that they should not turn their backs on academic methods of Bible study, even if the results might differ from traditional evangelical views. F.F. Bruce's accomplishments were astounding. He was head of the Department of Biblical History and Literature at the University of Sheffield and Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester. He was president of societies for both the study of the Old Testament and the study of the New Testament. Professor Bruce authored more than fifty books and nearly 2,000 articles and reviews. Christianity Today named his New Testament Documents: Are They Reliable? one of the top 50 books that had shaped evangelicals. His commentaries on the Acts of the Apostles and Hebrews are considered to be classics. He was editor of The Evangelical Quarterly and the Palestine Exploration Quarterly. In Retrospect paints a memorable picture of F.F. Bruce's childhood in northern Scotland, his academic training at Aberdeen, Cambridge, and Vienna, and his career. His amazing memory is demonstrated in the book's details; his delightful sense of humor in its stories of friends, and acquaintances; his equanimity in its accounts of academia and evangelicalism; and his spiritual heritage as one of the Brethren, a network of local assemblies. His modesty and reserve also come through in that he tells less than many readers would like to know about his own spiritual experience and his family life. F.F. Bruce was a blessed man with a satisfied mind. Here is a book that will warm your heart, enlighten your mind and call you to faithfulness to Jesus and his church.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageWhat the Bible Says about the Holy Spirit: An Essential Truth of Christianity by Richard Bewes | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/what-the-bible-says-about-the-holy-spiritHave you ever wanted to know more of what the Bible says about the Holy Spirit? These six studies about the Holy Spirit, his work, his activity, and his gifts are deceptively short, simple, and clear. Each one can be read quickly, but if you really delve into them – checking the Scriptures, working through the Bible studies, thinking through the reflection questions – you will find a rich study resource. The Bible Themes resource at the end is a useful alphabetical listing of key Bible themes that gives practical and teaching help along with Scripture references. The "see also" cross references are linked within the section. You can use this ebook for personal Bible study or for group study. The church of Jesus Christ has survived martyrdom and persecution across the centuries, and yet it continues to grow and thrive. Nations may rise and fall, but they are only a footnote to the ongoing victory of Christ's world-wide family. Great spiritual awakenings always feature moral repentance, thousands of conversions, and a thirst for the Scriptures and for heartfelt prayer. All this is due to the work of the Holy Spirit. Just before Jesus ascended into heaven, he told his disciples, "You will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses . . . to the ends of the earth" (Acts 1:8). When the Holy Spirit transforms a person, the fruit of the Spirit will be demonstrated in that believer as love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageWhat the Bible Says about the Christian: An Essential Truth of Christianity by Richard Bewes | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/what-the-bible-says-about-the-christianHave you ever wanted to know more of what the Bible says about being a Christian? These six studies are deceptively short, simple, and clear. Each one can be read quickly, but if you really delve into them – checking the Scriptures, working through the Bible studies, thinking through the reflection questions – you will find a rich study resource. The Bible Themes resource at the end is a useful alphabetical listing of key Bible themes that gives practical and teaching help along with Scripture references. The "see also" cross references are linked within the section. You can use this ebook for personal Bible study or for group study. What does it mean to be a Christian? The term can be applied to a political party, to a philosophy, or to a morality or ethic. In The Screwtape Letters, C.S. Lewis has the senior demon advise Wormwood, "If men become Christians at all, … keep them in the state of mind I call 'Christianity And'. You know . . . Christianity and Faith Healing, . . . Christianity and Vegetarianism, Christianity and Spelling Reform. If they must be Christians . . . substitute for the faith itself some Fashion with a Christian colouring." These studies will take you firmly into what it means to be a Christian believer as lived out and taught by Jesus and his disciples. We will talk about the Bible, about prayer, about witnessing, and about living in the world. Even the most promising followers of Christ can be diverted by today's fads and trends–"Christianity And". That's why these studies will help you to live a biblical Christianity.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageWhat the Bible Says about Salvation: An Essential Truth of Christianity by Richard Bewes | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/what-the-bible-says-about-salvationHave you ever wanted to know more of what the Bible says about salvation? These six studies are deceptively short, simple, and clear. Each one can be read quickly, but if you really delve into them – checking the Scriptures, working through the Bible studies, thinking through the reflection questions – you will find a rich study resource. The Bible Themes resource at the end is a useful alphabetical listing of key Bible themes that gives practical and teaching help along with Scripture references. The "see also" cross references are linked within the section. You can use this ebook for personal Bible study or for group study. Although we humans are universally guilty, confused, and separated from God – both because of the fall of Adam as well as because of our own personal sinful nature – God has lovingly sought to reconcile us to himself. We need a new direction and a new nature. Some people respond to God's love; others become so used to living in separation from God that their conscience becomes dead. When we repent and abandon our old way of life, God forgives us and empowers us through the Holy Spirit. We are then accepted by God in Christ, and made a new person. Once we experience God's salvation, God wants us to become more like him in our thoughts and actions. This process of becoming more holy – called sanctification – is a lifelong one.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageSecond Thoughts On the Dead Sea Scrolls: The First Book to Read About the Story, The Scrolls, And Their Significance by F.F. Bruce | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/second-thoughts-on-the-dead-sea-scrollsF.F. Bruce's account of finding the Dead Sea Scrolls and learning of their importance will make you feel as if you are making the discoveries yourself. Although first written fewer than ten years after the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, this third edition (1964) is an excellent, readable introduction to the greatest manuscript discovery of modern times." F.F. Bruce's balanced and thoughtful book answers the questions readers still want to know about the story, the Qumran community, the scrolls, and their significance for the histories of Judaism and Christianity and for biblical studies. The book's chapters: 1. The First Discoveries 2. Later Discoveries 3. Wadi Murabba'at and Khirbet Mird 4. Dating the Finds 5. Khirbet Qumran 6. The Scrolls and the Old Testament 7. Biblical Interpretation 8. The Messianic Hope 9. The Teacher of Righteousness and His Enemies 10. The Qumran Community 11. Qumran and the Essenes 12. Qumran and Christianity "No matter at what point one brings the record of the Dead Sea discoveries to a provisional conclusion," Bruce says, "it will be many years before 'Finis' can be written. Perhaps indeed all that is contained in the foregoing pages is only the beginning." Although more details are now known about the Dead Sea Scrolls and they can now be viewed online, this is still one of the best introductions available.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageWhat the Bible Says about the Church: An Essential Truth of Christianity by Richard Bewes | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/what-the-bible-says-about-the-churchHave you ever wanted to know more of what the Bible says about the church? These six studies are deceptively short, simple, and clear. Each one can be read quickly, but if you really delve into them – checking the Scriptures, working through the Bible studies, thinking through the reflection questions – you will find a rich study resource. The Bible Themes resource at the end is a useful alphabetical listing of key Bible themes that gives practical and teaching help along with Scripture references. The "see also" cross references are linked within the section. You can use this ebook for personal Bible study or for group study. The church of Jesus Christ is the whole company of redeemed people. It is an organism rather than an organization, a living fellowship rather than mere buildings, a close family rather than a collection of individuals. Throughout its 2,000-year history, the church's survival has been in question. It has been written off by critics. It has been persecuted and oppressed. It has been divided by contentious schisms. It has been plagued by heresies. It has been weakened by prosperity and popularity. And although it has taken many forms, it has always survived. In these studies we will learn of its characteristics, its nature and mission, its relationship to Christ, its authority, and its ordinances.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageWhat the Bible Says about the Last Things: An Essential Truth of Christianity by Richard Bewes | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/what-the-bible-says-about-the-last-thingsHave you ever wanted to know more of what the Bible says about the last things? These six studies are deceptively short, simple, and clear. Each one can be read quickly, but if you really delve into them – checking the Scriptures, working through the Bible studies, thinking through the reflection questions – you will find a rich study resource. The Bible Themes resource at the end is a useful alphabetical listing of key Bible themes that gives practical and teaching help along with Scripture references. The "see also" cross references are linked within the section. You can use this ebook for personal Bible study or for group study. "For the Lord himself will come down from heaven, with a loud command, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet call of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first. After that, we who are still alive and are left will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And so we will be with the Lord for ever" (1 Thessalonians 4:16-17). The Christian's hope is a confidence that God's purposes in history will be fulfilled, culminating in the return of Jesus Christ as described by Paul in 1 Thessalonians. The Bible says that before Christ's return there will be disorder in the world, and after Christ's return will be the final judgement. Then will be a new heaven and a new earth with the thrones of God and Christ. "Whoever is thirsty, let him come; and whoever wishes, let him take the free gift of the water of life" (Revelation 22:17).eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageThe Open Your Bible New Testament Commentary: Page by Page by F.F. Bruce | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/the-open-your-bible-new-testament-commentaryThe Open Your Bible Commentary was written to encourage daily Bible study. Each reading is short, but don't let the brevity fool you! The content is rich with careful explanation, devotional warmth, and practical relevance. It is in two books, Old Testament and New Testament, each containing nearly 1,000 daily readings. What sets this commentary apart from others are the pastor-teachers who wrote it. The list of authors of the New Testament commentary is like a Who's Who of evangelical scholarship: E.M. Blaiklock, F.F. Bruce, H.L. Ellison, William L. Lane, I. Howard Marshall, Ralph P. Martin, Leon Morris, and Robin E. Nixon. The Open Your Bible Commentary has four great strengths: Accessible – it's written for the average, thoughtful Christian without assuming a great deal of background, yet it is never superficial. Digestible – it's written so you can read a section or two a day, working your way through an entire book of the Bible in days or weeks. Dependable – it's written by an amazing group of scholars and trusted pastor-teachers. Practical – it's a rich combination of specific application and encouragement to listen to God for guidance. The Open Your Bible Commentary reveals the context of each chapter of the Bible, draws out the truth, and applies it to your daily life, enabling you to understand and appreciate what God is saying. It will help you to Discover the content of the Bible Understand the truths of the Bible Apply the message of the BibleeBook
Full ImagePreview ImageJohn by Robin E. Nixon | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/john1The Gospel of John was written so that those who read it might believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God and find eternal life. It is different in approach from the other three gospels. In the first half John alternates seven signs (miracles) with seven sayings (lengthy teachings) backed up by seven statements Jesus makes about himself (each beginning with "I am"). In the second half John records the events of the final week of Jesus' life, which includes instruction to his disciples, his death, his resurrection, and his appearances after his resurrection. The Open Your Bible Commentary was written to encourage daily Bible study. Each reading is short, but the content is rich with careful explanation, devotional warmth, and practical relevance. Nearly 100 daily readings let you explore the Gospel of John in depth. The Open Your Bible Commentary has four great strengths: Accessible – it's written for the average, thoughtful Christian without assuming a great deal of background, yet it is never superficial. Digestible – it's written so you can read a section or two a day, working your way through an entire book of the Bible in days or weeks. Dependable – it's written by an amazing group of scholars and trusted pastor-teachers. Practical – it's a rich combination of specific application and encouragement to listen to God for guidance. The commentary on John is introduced by an overview, summary, outline, key themes, and relevance of this gospel for today.eBook
Full ImagePreview ImageWhat the Bible Says about God's Messengers: An Essential Truth of Christianity by Richard Bewes | BookBaby Bookshophttps://store.bookbaby.com/book/what-the-bible-says-about-gods-messengersHave you ever wanted to know more of what the Bible says about God's messengers? These six studies are deceptively short, simple, and clear. Each one can be read quickly, but if you really delve into them – checking the Scriptures, working through the Bible studies, thinking through the reflection questions – you will find a rich study resource. The Bible Themes resource at the end is a useful alphabetical listing of key Bible themes that gives practical and teaching help along with Scripture references. The "see also" cross references are linked within the section. You can use this ebook for personal Bible study or for group study. God has not released his blessings and his Word upon the world like an unaccompanied parachute dropped from heaven. He has used messengers to convey his blessings and his message. •Angels are created heavenly beings who attend God, acclaim his holiness, and praise his Son. They also give protection and support to God's people. •The patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were the earliest heads of the family chosen by God to receive his covenant blessings on behalf of believers of all generations. •The Old Testament priests were mediators through whom Israelites approached God. They were a picture of Jesus Christ, God's final and perfect mediator. •The Old Testament prophets received messages from God and delivered those messages to God's people. •The apostles were a group, originally twelve, selected by Jesus Christ to act in his name. Certain others, such as Paul, were also recognized as apostles. •Although all Christians are to share their faith, certain ones have been given the gift of an evangelist by the Holy Spirit.eBook

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