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Expanding "We Spaces" Narrowing the Management Paradox
An Explanation of We Space Theory by its Originator
by Charles Ehin View author's profile page

Overview


The focus of the book is on "We Space Theory" recently developed by the author. It mainly deals with the levels of supportive relationships—mutuality of cognition, experience and perception --within and between organizational unit members. Its aim is to pinpoint the key factors and their collective dynamics that lead to greater organizational agility--the ability to effectively detect, assess, and respond to changing conditions.

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Description


Since the Agricultural Revolution, roughly 12,000 years ago, we have gradually developed a two-pronged approach to managing people. One is the practice of using managers to assure that every member of an organization reporting to them thoroughly understands what's expected of them and properly follow established goals and directives. Concurrently, bosses expect every subordinate to be as fully engaged with their assignments and designated coworkers—perform integrated self-management. Using both approaches simultaneously is far from ideal. It usually does produce "adequate" results but considerably less than using the latter method independently. Specifically, dominance (attempted control of others) instantaneously generates subconscious resistance since it is a "perceived threat." Conversely, extended autonomy (self-management) instantaneously generates perceived acceptance since it's a "perceived reward." We Spaces are not new. They have been the "key features" of all social systems since before the dawn of our species. We are members of countless We Spaces throughout our lives. Yet, we pay little attention to them, especially in our formal/public institutions, since they tend to be "invisible," conveniently tucked away in our subconscious minds. Essentially, We Spaces are the "relatively small intimate and voluntarily formed well-being zones" that provide comfort and sustenance to all of us as much as possible. They are also key to the preservation of our individual identities. It's the recognition by all that collaboration, instead of attempts at domination, are in the best interest of everyone involved.
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About the author


Charles (Kalev) Ehin is the author of three management books and numerous articles about engagement and self-management. He is also the originator of We Space Theory. Currently he is Professor and Dean Emeritus at The Gore School of Business at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah. Prior to joining Westminster College, he was an organizational development manager at E-Systems-Montek Division in Salt Lake City. He also served in the US Air Force as an officer for 20 years where he was a member of the Air Command and Staff College faculty for serval years.

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Book details

Genre:BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Subgenre:Decision-Making & Problem Solving

Language:English

Pages:44

Format:Paperback

eBook ISBN:9781098324728

Paperback ISBN:9781098324711


Overview


The focus of the book is on "We Space Theory" recently developed by the author. It mainly deals with the levels of supportive relationships—mutuality of cognition, experience and perception --within and between organizational unit members. Its aim is to pinpoint the key factors and their collective dynamics that lead to greater organizational agility--the ability to effectively detect, assess, and respond to changing conditions.

Read more

Description


Since the Agricultural Revolution, roughly 12,000 years ago, we have gradually developed a two-pronged approach to managing people. One is the practice of using managers to assure that every member of an organization reporting to them thoroughly understands what's expected of them and properly follow established goals and directives. Concurrently, bosses expect every subordinate to be as fully engaged with their assignments and designated coworkers—perform integrated self-management. Using both approaches simultaneously is far from ideal. It usually does produce "adequate" results but considerably less than using the latter method independently. Specifically, dominance (attempted control of others) instantaneously generates subconscious resistance since it is a "perceived threat." Conversely, extended autonomy (self-management) instantaneously generates perceived acceptance since it's a "perceived reward." We Spaces are not new. They have been the "key features" of all social systems since before the dawn of our species. We are members of countless We Spaces throughout our lives. Yet, we pay little attention to them, especially in our formal/public institutions, since they tend to be "invisible," conveniently tucked away in our subconscious minds. Essentially, We Spaces are the "relatively small intimate and voluntarily formed well-being zones" that provide comfort and sustenance to all of us as much as possible. They are also key to the preservation of our individual identities. It's the recognition by all that collaboration, instead of attempts at domination, are in the best interest of everyone involved.

Read more

About the author


Charles (Kalev) Ehin is the author of three management books and numerous articles about engagement and self-management. He is also the originator of We Space Theory. Currently he is Professor and Dean Emeritus at The Gore School of Business at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah. Prior to joining Westminster College, he was an organizational development manager at E-Systems-Montek Division in Salt Lake City. He also served in the US Air Force as an officer for 20 years where he was a member of the Air Command and Staff College faculty for serval years.

Read more


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