Cookies must be enabled to use this web application.

To allow this site to use cookies, use the steps that apply to your browser below. If your browser is not listed below, or if you have any questions regarding this site, please contact us.

Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • 1. Select "Internet Options" from the Tools menu.
  • 2. Click on the "Privacy" tab.
  • 3. Click the "Default" button.
  • 4. Click "OK" to save changes.
Chrome Chrome
  • 1. Click the "Spanner" icon in the top right of the browser.
  • 2. Click Options and change to the "Under the Hood" tab.
  • 3. Scroll down until you see "Cookie settings:".
  • 4. Set this to "Allow all cookies".
Firefox Firefox
  • 1. Go to the "Tools" menu and select "Options".
  • 2. Click the "Privacy" icon on the top of the window.
  • 3. Click on the "Cookies" tab.
  • 4. Check the box corresponding to "Allow sites to set Cookies.
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Opera Opera
  • 1. Click on the "Tools" menu and then click Preferences.
  • 2. Change to the Advanced tab, and to the cookie section.
  • 3. Select "Accept cookies only from the site I visit" or "Accept cookies".
  • 4. Ensure "Delete new cookies when exiting Opera" is not ticked.
  • 5. Click OK.
Netscape and Mozilla Suite Netscape and Mozilla Suite
  • 1. Select "Preferences" from the Edit menu.
  • 2. Click on the arrow next to "Privacy & Security".
  • 3. Under "Privacy & Security" select "Cookies".
  • 4. Select "Enable all cookies".
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Safari Safari
  • 1. Click on the "Cog" icon in Safari.
  • 2. Click Preferences.
  • 3. Change to the Security tab.
  • 4. Select "Only from sites I visit" or "Allow".
  • 5. Close the dialog using the cross.
Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:RELIGION
  • SubGenre:Theology
  • Language:English
  • Pages:300
  • eBook ISBN:9781483505336

The Rabbi Who Believes in Zeus

Popular Myths About Religion, Faith, and God

by Alan Lurie

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Overview
What is the purpose of religion? What is the meaning of faith? What is the nature of God? These are basic questions that have been asked by human beings for thousands of years. But recently these questions have erupted into open battle between two opposing camps. One side argues that religion is inherently destructive, that faith is irrational, and that God is a relic of archaic civilizations and immature science. The other responds that there is one true religion, that faith is the commitment to this religion, and that God is described in its holy documents. Each camp seeks to prove why the other is at best wrong, and at worst dangerous. These extremist positions present either/or choices between faith and reason, religion and science, and have led to condemnation, demonization, and even a rejection of the very idea of finding common ground. This divisiveness, which has been dubbed the “God Wars”, however, is based on common myths about religion, faith, and God, which have become so popular that they are often assumed, even by well-intended, educated people, to be unquestionably true. These myths include the ideas that religion is the cause of most wars, that faith is the blind acceptance of religious doctrine, that all religions worship different, conflicting gods, and that God is a physical being of some sort who is fully described in religious Holy Texts. While some of these myths may be true for a minority of the population, they do not describe normative religious beliefs and practices for the majority of believers today or in the past, and are not supported by the facts of history. THE RABBI WHO BELIEVES IN ZEUS corrects these myths by presenting religion, faith, and God in the light of history, theological insights, and personal experiences. The book then explores the reasons why these harmful myths so stubbornly persist, and closes with specific spiritual practices that can be used to heal the division and promote personal and communal growth.
Description
What is the purpose of religion? What is the meaning of faith? What is the nature of God? These are basic questions that have been asked by human beings for thousands of years. But recently these questions have erupted into open battle between two opposing camps. One side argues that religion is inherently destructive, that faith is irrational, and that God is a relic of archaic civilizations and immature science. The other responds that there is one true religion, that faith is the commitment to this religion, and that God is described in its holy documents. Each camp seeks to prove why the other is at best wrong, and at worst dangerous. These extremist positions present either/or choices between faith and reason, religion and science, and have led to condemnation, demonization, and even a rejection of the very idea of finding common ground. This divisiveness, which has been dubbed the “God Wars”, however, is based on common myths about religion, faith, and God, which have become so popular that they are often assumed, even by well-intended, educated people, to be unquestionably true. These myths include the ideas that religion is the cause of most wars, that faith is the blind acceptance of religious doctrine, that all religions worship different, conflicting gods, and that God is a physical being of some sort who is fully described in religious Holy Texts. While some of these myths may be true for a minority of the population, they do not describe normative religious beliefs and practices for the majority of believers today or in the past, and are not supported by the facts of history. THE RABBI WHO BELIEVES IN ZEUS corrects these myths by presenting religion, faith, and God in the light of history, theological insights, and personal experiences. The book then explores the reasons why these harmful myths so stubbornly persist, and closes with specific spiritual practices that can be used to heal the division and promote personal and communal growth.
About the author
Alan Lurie has a unique background. He has had a 30-year career as a licensed architect, and is currently Executive Vice President at DataGryd - a New York City based data center developer. He is also an ordained rabbi, teaching, leading prayer services, and writing on issues of faith and religion. This combination of meeting the demands of the business world while attending to the needs of the spirit gives Alan both insight into, and access to, a diverse community. He is also the author of Five Minutes on Mondays: Finding Unexpected, Purpose, Peace and Fulfillment at Work. His wife, Shirona, is a Cantor, singer, and accomplished songwriter. They live in Rye, New York.
Thanks for submitting a review!

Your review will need to be approved by the author before being posted.

See Inside
Front Cover

Loading book cover...

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Session Expiration WarningYour session is due to expire.

Your online session is due to expire shortly.
Would you like to extend your session and remain logged in?

Session Expired

Your session has expired.We're sorry, but your online session has expired.
Please log back into your account to continue.