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Silo Point
The New B&O Grain Elevator at Locust Point
by Cathie "CZ" Zimmerman

Overview


Located just outside the gates of Fort McHenry, what was once one of the largest and fastest grain elevators in the world is now a twenty-four story, 228-unit condominium. The old B&O Grain Elevator has been an icon on the Baltimore Harbor skyline for decades, but few people know the building's history or the role the Locust Point Terminal played in the development of the Port of Baltimore or in establishing Locust Point as one of the nation's busiest immigration ports of entry in the late 1800s. Using over 575 images of the Locust Point complex, the book tells the story of how the B&O built Locust Point from a coal export pier to one of the world's largest grain export terminals. Images by the developer's wife and a local photographer, Jeanine Turner, are used to illustrate what it took for Developer Pat Turner to transform the old B&O Grain Elevator into Silo Point—a luxury high-rise condominium. The book also answers the question ". . . how do you put condos where grain was once stored and processed?"
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Description


The old B&O Grain Elevator has been an icon on the Baltimore Harbor skyline for decades, but few people know the building's history or the role the Locust Point Terminal played in the development of the Port of Baltimore or in establishing Locust Point as one of the nation's busiest immigration ports of entry in the late 1800s. Using over 575 images of the Locust Point complex, the book tells the story of how the B&O built Locust Point from a coal export pier to one of the world's largest grain export terminals. Images by the developer's wife and a local photographer, Jeanine Turner, are used to illustrate what it took for Developer Pat Turner to transform the old B&O Grain Elevator into Silo Point—a luxury high-rise condominium. Read this book to learn more about: • Background on the three original grain elevators at Locust Point; there were a total of six B&O grain elevators in Baltimore • The Locust Point B&O Grain Elevator was once the tallest building in the city • The original concrete grain elevator was built using a 16 X 16-foot grid structure, which was retained in the new complex, creating unique floor plans for each unit • To construct the concrete silo walls, involved clock-like precision. Half an inch at a time, six or seven feet every 24 hours, the giant silos slowly rose toward the sky. • The B&O held the monopoly on immigration traffic in Baltimore from the mid-1800s until the 1910s
Read more

About the author


Cathie "CZ" Zimmerman moved into Silo Point in October 2014 and became intrigued by the building's past. Miss Zimmerman is retired from civil service and worked at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington DC for 27 years. Most of those years were spent as Deputy Chief of the US Coast Guard Aviation Safety Program. She's currently the editor of Silo Pointers—Silo Point Condominium monthly newsletter and spends her free time exploring Baltimore and volunteering in the Collections Department at the Baltimore Museum of Industry (BMI). She also helps out in the office at the Francis Scott Key Elementary/Middle School (#76) and volunteers with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Historical Society and with several Baltimore Office of Promotions and Art (BOPA) city events.
Read more

Book details

Genre:HISTORY

Subgenre:United States / State & Local / Middle Atlantic

Language:English

Pages:216

Hardcover ISBN:9798350907391


Overview


Located just outside the gates of Fort McHenry, what was once one of the largest and fastest grain elevators in the world is now a twenty-four story, 228-unit condominium. The old B&O Grain Elevator has been an icon on the Baltimore Harbor skyline for decades, but few people know the building's history or the role the Locust Point Terminal played in the development of the Port of Baltimore or in establishing Locust Point as one of the nation's busiest immigration ports of entry in the late 1800s. Using over 575 images of the Locust Point complex, the book tells the story of how the B&O built Locust Point from a coal export pier to one of the world's largest grain export terminals. Images by the developer's wife and a local photographer, Jeanine Turner, are used to illustrate what it took for Developer Pat Turner to transform the old B&O Grain Elevator into Silo Point—a luxury high-rise condominium. The book also answers the question ". . . how do you put condos where grain was once stored and processed?"

Read more

Description


The old B&O Grain Elevator has been an icon on the Baltimore Harbor skyline for decades, but few people know the building's history or the role the Locust Point Terminal played in the development of the Port of Baltimore or in establishing Locust Point as one of the nation's busiest immigration ports of entry in the late 1800s. Using over 575 images of the Locust Point complex, the book tells the story of how the B&O built Locust Point from a coal export pier to one of the world's largest grain export terminals. Images by the developer's wife and a local photographer, Jeanine Turner, are used to illustrate what it took for Developer Pat Turner to transform the old B&O Grain Elevator into Silo Point—a luxury high-rise condominium. Read this book to learn more about: • Background on the three original grain elevators at Locust Point; there were a total of six B&O grain elevators in Baltimore • The Locust Point B&O Grain Elevator was once the tallest building in the city • The original concrete grain elevator was built using a 16 X 16-foot grid structure, which was retained in the new complex, creating unique floor plans for each unit • To construct the concrete silo walls, involved clock-like precision. Half an inch at a time, six or seven feet every 24 hours, the giant silos slowly rose toward the sky. • The B&O held the monopoly on immigration traffic in Baltimore from the mid-1800s until the 1910s

Read more

About the author


Cathie "CZ" Zimmerman moved into Silo Point in October 2014 and became intrigued by the building's past. Miss Zimmerman is retired from civil service and worked at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington DC for 27 years. Most of those years were spent as Deputy Chief of the US Coast Guard Aviation Safety Program. She's currently the editor of Silo Pointers—Silo Point Condominium monthly newsletter and spends her free time exploring Baltimore and volunteering in the Collections Department at the Baltimore Museum of Industry (BMI). She also helps out in the office at the Francis Scott Key Elementary/Middle School (#76) and volunteers with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Historical Society and with several Baltimore Office of Promotions and Art (BOPA) city events.
Read more

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