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Book details
  • Genre:SELF-HELP
  • SubGenre:Personal Growth / Self-Esteem
  • Language:English
  • Pages:126
  • eBook ISBN:9781623094744

Emotional Self-Management: A Woman's Guide

by Ilana Singer

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Overview
Sarah is plagued. She notices her boss's scowl, her husband's silence, her daughter's shyness, her co-workers' gossip. Constant, churning thoughts intrude and consume her attention. Remarks that her friends brush off easily stay with her. Commentary inside her head is more absorbing than the real information around her. She ends up in emotional jams and doesn't know how she got there or how to get out. Everyone, her physician, therapist, boss, friends and family, tell her she is too sensitive, that her susceptibility to attitudes, feelings or circumstances compromises her well-being. She has tried everything she knows to stop reacting and eliminate this burden. But her tendency to notice feelings and emotions, then analyze what the affect meant and how to reply returns to victimize her. Sarah, like most women, is unaware of the latest research on sensitivity (a woman's natural responsiveness to the emotional atmosphere around her). The capacity for rapid, involuntary responses to one's surroundings is a normal attribute, highly developed in women. Sarah could learn to capitalize on this asset. But, to date, no friend, professional or self-help book has delivered a workable strategy of how to operate differently. Sarah needs to build a mental format that conducts her mental affairs and circumvents her emotional distress. She needs reliable step-by-step direction. I have written such a book: Emotional Self-Management: A Woman's Guide. Who would buy this book? Women from 18 to 75, women who want to engage their own common sense and mental resources, women who want dependable, long-term solutions, not analysis. Today's woman wants to test-drive a strategy that allows her to progress at her own speed and in the privacy of her own head. The market is large. Recent studies show 2/3rds of working mothers and career women are at greater risk of stress than men. Reports also show grandmothers more susceptible to the wear and tear of child care than grandfathers.
Description
Sarah is plagued. She notices her boss's scowl, her husband's silence, her daughter's shyness, her co-workers' gossip. Constant, churning thoughts intrude and consume her attention. Remarks that her friends brush off easily stay with her. Commentary inside her head is more absorbing than the real information around her. She ends up in emotional jams and doesn't know how she got there or how to get out. Everyone, her physician, therapist, boss, friends and family, tell her she is too sensitive, that her susceptibility to attitudes, feelings or circumstances compromises her well-being. She has tried everything she knows to stop reacting and eliminate this burden. But her tendency to notice feelings and emotions, then analyze what the affect meant and how to reply returns to victimize her. Sarah, like most women, is unaware of the latest research on sensitivity (a woman's natural responsiveness to the emotional atmosphere around her). The capacity for rapid, involuntary responses to one's surroundings is a normal attribute, highly developed in women. Sarah could learn to capitalize on this asset. But, to date, no friend, professional or self-help book has delivered a workable strategy of how to operate differently. Sarah needs to build a mental format that conducts her mental affairs and circumvents her emotional distress. She needs reliable step-by-step direction. I have written such a book: Emotional Self-Management: A Woman's Guide. Who would buy this book? Women from 18 to 75, women who want to engage their own common sense and mental resources, women who want dependable, long-term solutions, not analysis. Today's woman wants to test-drive a strategy that allows her to progress at her own speed and in the privacy of her own head. The market is large. Recent studies show 2/3rds of working mothers and career women are at greater risk of stress than men. Reports also show grandmothers more susceptible to the wear and tear of child care than grandfathers. Not only will today's woman buy and keep the book, she will purchase copies for her friends and colleagues, her mother and aunts, her daughters and sisters. EMOTIONAL SELF-MANAGEMENT: A Woman's Guide successfully addresses a woman's needs. These easy-to-read sixteen chapters (187) put her on the road to emotional self-reliance, self-sufficiency and mental freedom.
About the author
Ilana Singer, Clinical Ethnologist, Professor of C-CTherapy®, Director of Women's Division. Professor Singer is a licensed psychotherapist in the human behavior field, since1972. Co-owner of the Center for Counter-Conditioning Therapy®, she established the Women's Division in 1985. As a Clinical Ethnologist, she teaches patients how to work with and conquer their mental turmoil. Professor Singer helped Oakland firestorm victims cope with their mental shock while they rebuilt their lives. For three years she wrote "The Therapist Column," published in the East Bay Journal for the firestorm community. Her published book, "Emotional Recovery After Natural Disasters: How to Get Back to Normal Life" tells how other victims of natural disasters can help themselves emotionally. She is a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and California State University, Hayward. In Memory: In an atmosphere of sadness, the Center is obliged to announce the passing of our esteemed clinical colleague, Ilana Singer, on February the 2nd 2009. Her contribution to the clinical content of the Center's non-medical, mental health services are beyond dispute.
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