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The Long Way Home
A Guide for The Ex-Felon, How to get Out and Stay Out

Overview


Those inside and the post incarcerated is in need of help;

  • how to write a resume with little to now work experience,

  • how to overcome the criminal background checks,

  • how to keep their information off the internet

  • how to get a job without discussion their background

  • how to get a new SSN,

People working on the behalf of the incarcerated need to understand the issues;

  •  the new Jim crow

  • prison industries, are the drive behind recidivism

  • rule 35 “the snitch policy” has put far too many inside without a shred of evidence

  • long term isolation, mandatory lock down and the SHU is torture.

  • why most halfway houses are just another obstacle

  • the socialization process is making hard for these people to re-adjust once released

What can the average person do to make a difference? From, the do’s and don’ts of becoming a prison volunteer. To helping to provide peer group counseling and so much more. All from the perspective of someone who knows and been through it all.

The writer has been a part of the system nearly his entire life, from an orphan, to many stents as a juvenile and to 20 years in prison. Today, as a father of three young men (ages 25, 23 and 17), he’s been free in for 13 years. Despite the tag of ex-felon, he’s had jobs

  • Unarmed Security

  • Work at BNA (the airport)

  • Contract employee for CSX (the rail road)

  • Civil Servant (state employee)

 In November 2014, he established Sankofa Charities Incorporated, a 501 c 3 non-profit organization, To provide transportation for the post-incarcerated, to and from work. The ultimate aim the writer, is to work and build with anyone involved in closing the door to recidivism.

Read more

Description


In these seven chapters, the readers will learn the history of the penal system which has been used as a weapon against the black population's growth, for over 100 years. The direct correlation with the institution of slavery from an historical context as the long fought battles to get industries in prisons, after being forced out only to return and change the entire system into a billion dollar business.

Learn of the socialization process, and the brutality that under-develops people in prison, making it difficult to re-adjust to society once released. And how to help the post incarcerated by learning why "halfway houses" don't work and what program is working and why? And if the reader by chance is working with the post-incarcerated, they’ll learn how to orientation the newly released on "the social media trap," and what to consider when facing the "criminal background checks. These and other view point of recidivism, are all from the perspective of those inside the prison walls.


Read more

About the author


Rich Jinks AKA "RICH MAN” is now fifty-two years old. At age of two, his mother committed suicide which left him and his three year old brother to be raised by his grandparents both of whom were handicap. At age eight his grandmother pasted away, shortly afterward the department of human services removed him and brother from the home. Though he would be adopted twice more, he would spend most of his youth in state custody in the form of orphanages, group homes, and juvenile institutions. At age 18, while in jail waiting to go into the prison system, for a three years sentence as the passenger of a stolen car, he was involved in an altercations. One of many, but this one cause him to receive an additional six year sentence. Nevertheless, after four years and two months was released at age 22. Over the next three and a half months, he was arrested several times for weapons, robberies and shootings. At this point, he was denied a bond and ultimately sentenced 220 months in federal prison.  

Two year into his sentence a suicide attempt put Mr. Jinks in Acoma for five days. And it was at that moment as he explains it, that he had epiphany. Mr. Jinks now no longer a victim but a sexual assault survivor became proactive. He filed law suits siting official abuse, he worked with various groups to quell violence, to create unity, and encourage self-development. He received his GED and received state and national certification as a Computer Operator, in Horticulture, and Upholstery Technology. And helped facilitate food service program where he received an Apprenticeship as Cook from the U.S. Department of Labor. He was released at age 39, he got married at age 43 and has three step sons.

Read more

Book details

Genre:SOCIAL SCIENCE

Subgenre:Penology

Language:English

Pages:246

Format:Paperback

eBook ISBN:9781098304843

Paperback ISBN:9781098304836


Overview


Those inside and the post incarcerated is in need of help;

  • how to write a resume with little to now work experience,

  • how to overcome the criminal background checks,

  • how to keep their information off the internet

  • how to get a job without discussion their background

  • how to get a new SSN,

People working on the behalf of the incarcerated need to understand the issues;

  •  the new Jim crow

  • prison industries, are the drive behind recidivism

  • rule 35 “the snitch policy” has put far too many inside without a shred of evidence

  • long term isolation, mandatory lock down and the SHU is torture.

  • why most halfway houses are just another obstacle

  • the socialization process is making hard for these people to re-adjust once released

What can the average person do to make a difference? From, the do’s and don’ts of becoming a prison volunteer. To helping to provide peer group counseling and so much more. All from the perspective of someone who knows and been through it all.

The writer has been a part of the system nearly his entire life, from an orphan, to many stents as a juvenile and to 20 years in prison. Today, as a father of three young men (ages 25, 23 and 17), he’s been free in for 13 years. Despite the tag of ex-felon, he’s had jobs

  • Unarmed Security

  • Work at BNA (the airport)

  • Contract employee for CSX (the rail road)

  • Civil Servant (state employee)

 In November 2014, he established Sankofa Charities Incorporated, a 501 c 3 non-profit organization, To provide transportation for the post-incarcerated, to and from work. The ultimate aim the writer, is to work and build with anyone involved in closing the door to recidivism.

Read more

Description


In these seven chapters, the readers will learn the history of the penal system which has been used as a weapon against the black population's growth, for over 100 years. The direct correlation with the institution of slavery from an historical context as the long fought battles to get industries in prisons, after being forced out only to return and change the entire system into a billion dollar business.

Learn of the socialization process, and the brutality that under-develops people in prison, making it difficult to re-adjust to society once released. And how to help the post incarcerated by learning why "halfway houses" don't work and what program is working and why? And if the reader by chance is working with the post-incarcerated, they’ll learn how to orientation the newly released on "the social media trap," and what to consider when facing the "criminal background checks. These and other view point of recidivism, are all from the perspective of those inside the prison walls.


Read more

About the author


Rich Jinks AKA "RICH MAN” is now fifty-two years old. At age of two, his mother committed suicide which left him and his three year old brother to be raised by his grandparents both of whom were handicap. At age eight his grandmother pasted away, shortly afterward the department of human services removed him and brother from the home. Though he would be adopted twice more, he would spend most of his youth in state custody in the form of orphanages, group homes, and juvenile institutions. At age 18, while in jail waiting to go into the prison system, for a three years sentence as the passenger of a stolen car, he was involved in an altercations. One of many, but this one cause him to receive an additional six year sentence. Nevertheless, after four years and two months was released at age 22. Over the next three and a half months, he was arrested several times for weapons, robberies and shootings. At this point, he was denied a bond and ultimately sentenced 220 months in federal prison.  

Two year into his sentence a suicide attempt put Mr. Jinks in Acoma for five days. And it was at that moment as he explains it, that he had epiphany. Mr. Jinks now no longer a victim but a sexual assault survivor became proactive. He filed law suits siting official abuse, he worked with various groups to quell violence, to create unity, and encourage self-development. He received his GED and received state and national certification as a Computer Operator, in Horticulture, and Upholstery Technology. And helped facilitate food service program where he received an Apprenticeship as Cook from the U.S. Department of Labor. He was released at age 39, he got married at age 43 and has three step sons.

Read more
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