Cookies must be enabled to use this web application.

To allow this site to use cookies, use the steps that apply to your browser below. If your browser is not listed below, or if you have any questions regarding this site, please contact us.

Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • 1. Select "Internet Options" from the Tools menu.
  • 2. Click on the "Privacy" tab.
  • 3. Click the "Default" button.
  • 4. Click "OK" to save changes.
Chrome Chrome
  • 1. Click the "Spanner" icon in the top right of the browser.
  • 2. Click Options and change to the "Under the Hood" tab.
  • 3. Scroll down until you see "Cookie settings:".
  • 4. Set this to "Allow all cookies".
Firefox Firefox
  • 1. Go to the "Tools" menu and select "Options".
  • 2. Click the "Privacy" icon on the top of the window.
  • 3. Click on the "Cookies" tab.
  • 4. Check the box corresponding to "Allow sites to set Cookies.
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Opera Opera
  • 1. Click on the "Tools" menu and then click Preferences.
  • 2. Change to the Advanced tab, and to the cookie section.
  • 3. Select "Accept cookies only from the site I visit" or "Accept cookies".
  • 4. Ensure "Delete new cookies when exiting Opera" is not ticked.
  • 5. Click OK.
Netscape and Mozilla Suite Netscape and Mozilla Suite
  • 1. Select "Preferences" from the Edit menu.
  • 2. Click on the arrow next to "Privacy & Security".
  • 3. Under "Privacy & Security" select "Cookies".
  • 4. Select "Enable all cookies".
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Safari Safari
  • 1. Click on the "Cog" icon in Safari.
  • 2. Click Preferences.
  • 3. Change to the Security tab.
  • 4. Select "Only from sites I visit" or "Allow".
  • 5. Close the dialog using the cross.
Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS
  • SubGenre:General
  • Language:English
  • Pages:348
  • eBook ISBN:9781886068803

Stories for a Sunday Afternoon

by Maynard H. Mires, M.D.

Book Image Not Available
Overview
Everyone goes by different names and wears many hats, so to speak, during his or her lifetime. The author of Stories for a Sunday Afternoon is no exception. Members of the extended family described in these stories know him as dad, grandfather, uncle, and father-in-law. Others call him doctor, captain, brother, and friend. Those no longer with us knew him by the most cherished names of son and husband. Many of the stories in this memoir include friends and family and are the product of a lifelong passion for history and genealogy. Stories for a Sunday Afternoon appeals to a wider audience for many reasons. It describes the life of a member of what has become known as “The Greatest Generation.” Like so many during the years of World War II, Dr. Mires grew up fast to serve his country. An earlier ambition to become a medical missionary came to fruition in the 1950s and 1960s through U.S. government-sponsored work in Thailand and Panama. Several stories about his foreign service not only tell of the lanky physician in pith helmet and khakis in the jungles of Southeast Asia and Central America, they relate the remote village life of his patients to larger contemporary geopolitical and social issues. Most memoirs, it seems, improve with the age of the author, which underscores the biblical phrase, “With long life is understanding” (Job 12:12). Dr. Mires has seen and experienced a lot in 90 years, from growing up the son of a country veterinarian and grandson of a wagon maker to navigating his way around Cyberspace. This man—who befriended Civil War veterans and treated the wounds of those who fought in the Pacific during World War II—shares his heartwarming and sometimes witty stories with all who care to learn from a life well-lived.
Description
Everyone goes by different names and wears many hats, so to speak, during his or her lifetime. The author of Stories for a Sunday Afternoon is no exception. Members of the extended family described in these stories know him as dad, grandfather, uncle, and father-in-law. Others call him doctor, captain, brother, and friend. Those no longer with us knew him by the most cherished names of son and husband. Many of the stories in this memoir include friends and family and are the product of a lifelong passion for history and genealogy. Stories for a Sunday Afternoon appeals to a wider audience for many reasons. It describes the life of a member of what has become known as “The Greatest Generation.” Like so many during the years of World War II, Dr. Mires grew up fast to serve his country. An earlier ambition to become a medical missionary came to fruition in the 1950s and 1960s through U.S. government-sponsored work in Thailand and Panama. Several stories about his foreign service not only tell of the lanky physician in pith helmet and khakis in the jungles of Southeast Asia and Central America, they relate the remote village life of his patients to larger contemporary geopolitical and social issues. Most memoirs, it seems, improve with the age of the author, which underscores the biblical phrase, “With long life is understanding” (Job 12:12). Dr. Mires has seen and experienced a lot in 90 years, from growing up the son of a country veterinarian and grandson of a wagon maker to navigating his way around Cyberspace. This man—who befriended Civil War veterans and treated the wounds of those who fought in the Pacific during World War II—shares his heartwarming and sometimes witty stories with all who care to learn from a life well-lived. I believe that there comes a time in everyone’s life when he/she feels like setting down a few facts and stories about the family. This combination historical-biographical account contains facts, anecdotes, and sometimes “hearsay” which will supposedly be of interest to other members of the extended family. The reader will occasionally notice discrepancies, but these can be easily explained by the fact that the stories came from many sources. One relative would tell me something about an ancestor; another would relate the same story, but the details might not agree! I hope that the reader will enjoy these narratives as much as I enjoyed writing them. The temptation was very strong to call these bits and pieces of family history “The Tales of a Grandfather,” but this would have been pure plagiarism! Our beloved Scottish author, Sir Walter Scott, used that title in a neat little three-volume set written for his grandson in 1828. Fortunately, I have these books in excellent shape which shall eventually be passed on to one of my descendants. So, read these stories and be justly proud of those in your bloodline who have gone before. You are part of this heritage! Maynard H. Mires, M.D.
About the author
Maynard H. Mires, Jr. was born in Ithaca, New York on March 18, 1924 to Dr. Maynard H. Mires and Ethel E. (Coon) Mires, was educated in the public schools of Sherburne, New York, and received his pre-medical education at Hamilton College, Clinton, New York. Graduation from the University of Buffalo College of Medicine and marriage to the former Ruth A. Bingham of Buffalo occurred on the same day: June 22, 1946. This union has been blessed with four children: Col. Stephen A. Mires (USAF, Ret.), Dr. Peter B. Mires, Dr. Martha M. Britt, and Ms. Amy M. Poisson. Dr. Mires began his career in military medicine immediately out of medical school by serving two years at the U. S. Marine Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, plus a tour of sea duty in the North Atlantic. He was then trained in communicable disease control, and worked as an epidemiologist in Mississippi and Texas. In 1951-52, he was on loan to the U. S. Department of State, and served as a member of the Special Technical and Economic Mission in Thailand. Near the end of this period, he was assigned the task of setting up clinic facilities for the treatment of malaria, filariasis, yaws, and trachoma in one area of western Cambodia. Upon return to the United States, he transferred to the Ready Reserves in order to become Communicable Disease Director with the Vermont Department of Health. He was sent to the Harvard School of Public Health in 1953-54, and received the Degree of Master of Public Health (cum laude). His thesis, a Plan for Village Life Improvement and Community Development in Iraq, was put into effect in Mosul, Iraq. While in Vermont, Dr. Mires was involved in the field trial of Salk Polio Vaccine, collated and updated the Health Regulations for the state, and revised treatment policies for Tuberculosis control. In 1956, he became certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine, and that same year helped found the NH-VT American Trudeau Society. The move to Delaware in 1957 initiated a new chapter as he was appointed Director of Local Health Services with the State Board of Health, charged with assuring the uniform availability and accessibility of preventive health services in the three counties. Seeing the need for an improved Medical Examiner’s system, he cooperated with the Attorney General and the Medical Society in seeking a top-notch forensic pathologist, resulting in the hiring of Dr. Ali Z. Hameli. Another felt need was the training of home health aides and homemakers, so he founded the Homemakers’ Service of Central Delaware, which has evolved into Geriatric Services. The large numbers of migrant agricultural workers coming to Delaware each season necessitated the writing of regulations governing Migrant Health, the founding and funding of a system of health information exchange among the states from Florida to New York. At the invitation of the Director of the College of Nursing at the University of Delaware, a former Harvard classmate, he became a regular lecturer to the student nurses. Dr. Mires’s interest in international health was manifested again during the 1960s when he was sent on three separate occasions to work with health and social agencies (AID, CARE, etc.) serving the indigenous Cuna Indians of San Blas and Guaymi Indians of Chiriqui, Panama. In 1973, he accepted the invitation to move to New Hampshire where he was appointed Director of the Division of Public Health Services, which included two other duties: Executive Secretary of the State Board of Registration in Medicine, and Associate Professor of Community Health at Dartmouth Medical School. In New Hampshire, he was an active member of both the NH Lung Association and the NH Division of the American Cancer Society. He was President of the Merrimack County Medical Society in 1979. In 1981, Dr. Mires and his wife returned to Delaware, and during the 1980s he was employed as Director of the Sussex County Health Unit, until his retirement. He was presented with the Distinguish
Thanks for submitting a review!

Your review will need to be approved by the author before being posted.

See Inside
Session Expiration WarningYour session is due to expire.

Your online session is due to expire shortly.
Would you like to extend your session and remain logged in?

Session Expired

Your session has expired.We're sorry, but your online session has expired.
Please log back into your account to continue.