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Book details
  • Genre:SELF-HELP
  • SubGenre:Substance Abuse & Addictions / General
  • Language:English
  • Pages:56
  • eBook ISBN:9780990790020

Quick Guide to Addiction Recovery

What Helps, What Doesn't

by Lisa Frederiksen View author's profile page

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Overview
“Alcoholism a disease? No way! Cancer is a disease. All they have to do is put down the bottle!” “If he cared enough about what he was doing to his parents, he’d get help. It’s that simple.” “She’s been through rehab before – I don’t see how this time will be any different.” Likely you've heard statements like these. Perhaps you’ve even thought them, yourself. So much of what we believe about addiction and addiction recovery is bound up in stigma, misinformation and shame. This fuels age-old beliefs that addiction is a choice and failure to stop is a lack of willpower, a moral weakness. Equally inaccurate is the assumption that relapse means treatment failed or the person didn’t want recovery badly enough. But times are changing. There is an active addiction recovery movement now gaining momentum. The word is spreading that more than 23 million Americans are living their lives in recovery from addiction, meaning they no longer use drugs and/or alcohol and have changed their lives through their recovery process. And President Obama's 2014 Presidential Proclamation of September as National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month included the following statement: “Research shows addiction is a chronic disease of the brain which can be prevented and treated. However, the stigma associated with this disease – and the false belief that addiction represents a personal failing – creates fear and shame that discourage people from seeking treatment and prevents them from fully rejoining and contributing to their communities.” So what’s happened? How is it possible to define addiction as a brain disease and explain that addiction recovery is all about “healing” the brain? And what is it that helps a person succeed in addiction recovery and what doesn't?
Description
“Alcoholism a disease? No way! Cancer is a disease. All they have to do is put down the bottle!” “If he cared enough about what he was doing to his parents, he’d get help. It’s that simple.” “She’s been through rehab before – I don’t see how this time will be any different.” Likely you've heard statements like these. Perhaps you’ve even thought them, yourself. So much of what we believe about addiction and addiction recovery is bound up in stigma, misinformation and shame. This fuels age-old beliefs that addiction is a choice and failure to stop is a lack of willpower, a moral weakness. Equally inaccurate is the assumption that relapse means treatment failed or the person didn’t want recovery badly enough. But times are changing. There is an active addiction recovery movement now gaining momentum. The word is spreading that more than 23 million Americans are living their lives in recovery from addiction, meaning they no longer use drugs and/or alcohol and have changed their lives through their recovery process. And President Obama's 2014 Presidential Proclamation of September as National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month included the following statement: “Research shows addiction is a chronic disease of the brain which can be prevented and treated. However, the stigma associated with this disease – and the false belief that addiction represents a personal failing – creates fear and shame that discourage people from seeking treatment and prevents them from fully rejoining and contributing to their communities.” So what’s happened? How is it possible to define addiction as a brain disease and explain that addiction recovery is all about “healing” the brain? And what is it that helps a person succeed in addiction recovery and what doesn't?
About the author

Lisa Frederiksen has 40+ years of personal experience with secondhand drinking, a concept she first introduced in 2009. Working to overcome its impact, she's spent the last 16 years studying and simplifying the newest brain and scientific research on topics related to those experiences. These topics include alcoholism, drug addiction, alcohol and other drug use disorders, mental illness, co-occurring disorders, the family member's experience, toxic stress, adverse childhood experiences, codependency, brain development, and childhood trauma.

Lisa founded BreakingTheCycles.com in 2008 to change, and in some cases simply start, the conversations on these topics. She has appeared as an expert guest on a variety of television, radio, and Internet radio programs, as well as authoring hundreds of blog posts and articles for other publications. She is a nationally-recognized keynote speaker with over 30 years' public speaking experience, and the author of twelve books, including Loved One In Treatment? Now What! and Secondhand Drinking: The Phenomenon That Affects Millions. She consults with individuals, families, and organizational clients throughout the United States and from as far away as Kenya, Mexico, and Ireland.

For more about Lisa Frederiksen, visit BreakingTheCycles.com and LisaFrederiksen.com.

Updated August 2019

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