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Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:SELF-HELP
  • SubGenre:Substance Abuse & Addictions / General
  • Language:English
  • Pages:56
  • eBook ISBN:9780990790020

Quick Guide to Addiction Recovery

What Helps, What Doesn't

by Lisa Frederiksen

Book Image Not Available
Overview
“Alcoholism a disease? No way! Cancer is a disease. All they have to do is put down the bottle!” “If he cared enough about what he was doing to his parents, he’d get help. It’s that simple.” “She’s been through rehab before – I don’t see how this time will be any different.” Likely you've heard statements like these. Perhaps you’ve even thought them, yourself. So much of what we believe about addiction and addiction recovery is bound up in stigma, misinformation and shame. This fuels age-old beliefs that addiction is a choice and failure to stop is a lack of willpower, a moral weakness. Equally inaccurate is the assumption that relapse means treatment failed or the person didn’t want recovery badly enough. But times are changing. There is an active addiction recovery movement now gaining momentum. The word is spreading that more than 23 million Americans are living their lives in recovery from addiction, meaning they no longer use drugs and/or alcohol and have changed their lives through their recovery process. And President Obama's 2014 Presidential Proclamation of September as National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month included the following statement: “Research shows addiction is a chronic disease of the brain which can be prevented and treated. However, the stigma associated with this disease – and the false belief that addiction represents a personal failing – creates fear and shame that discourage people from seeking treatment and prevents them from fully rejoining and contributing to their communities.” So what’s happened? How is it possible to define addiction as a brain disease and explain that addiction recovery is all about “healing” the brain? And what is it that helps a person succeed in addiction recovery and what doesn't?
Description
“Alcoholism a disease? No way! Cancer is a disease. All they have to do is put down the bottle!” “If he cared enough about what he was doing to his parents, he’d get help. It’s that simple.” “She’s been through rehab before – I don’t see how this time will be any different.” Likely you've heard statements like these. Perhaps you’ve even thought them, yourself. So much of what we believe about addiction and addiction recovery is bound up in stigma, misinformation and shame. This fuels age-old beliefs that addiction is a choice and failure to stop is a lack of willpower, a moral weakness. Equally inaccurate is the assumption that relapse means treatment failed or the person didn’t want recovery badly enough. But times are changing. There is an active addiction recovery movement now gaining momentum. The word is spreading that more than 23 million Americans are living their lives in recovery from addiction, meaning they no longer use drugs and/or alcohol and have changed their lives through their recovery process. And President Obama's 2014 Presidential Proclamation of September as National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month included the following statement: “Research shows addiction is a chronic disease of the brain which can be prevented and treated. However, the stigma associated with this disease – and the false belief that addiction represents a personal failing – creates fear and shame that discourage people from seeking treatment and prevents them from fully rejoining and contributing to their communities.” So what’s happened? How is it possible to define addiction as a brain disease and explain that addiction recovery is all about “healing” the brain? And what is it that helps a person succeed in addiction recovery and what doesn't?
About the author
21st Century brain research and science is the link running through Lisa Frederiksen’s Quick Guide eBooks. This research and science has unleashed an explosion in discoveries about the human brain, its development, its functioning, what changes it, what can heal it, its ability to regenerate cells and why secondhand drinking can have such a significant physical, emotional and quality-of-life changing impact on people. But it doesn’t help if we don’t understand this science, which is the point of Frederiksen’s Quick Guide series – sharing this science in a way people can use to self-elect change. Lisa has been researching, writing, speaking and consulting on a host of brain and addiction-related topics since 2003, a pivotal year for her. It was the year one of her loved ones entered residential treatment for alcoholism and she was plunged into a whole new world. As the author of several books by that time, she was well versed in researching complex subjects and elected to shift her efforts to understanding this new world, starting with trying to figure out why “they” called it a disease. Having learned to “re-eat” after 12 years bulimia and anorexia, she had always assumed people who drank too much could learn to “re-drink,” and thus had tolerated and coped with what she would soon understand was almost 40 years of various family members and friends’ alcohol abuse or alcoholism prior to the bottom falling out in ’03. Frederiksen shares what she has learned in her most recent books, If You Loved Me, You’d Stop!, Loved One in Treatment? Now What! and Crossing The Line From Alcohol Use to Abuse to Dependence, presentations, blog, workshops, videos and radio and Internet interviews. Her clients (some as far as Kenya, Slovenia and Mexico), include: individuals, families, military troops and personnel, medical school students, businesses, social workers, parent and student groups, family law attorneys, treatment providers and the like. Visit www.BreakingTheCycles.com for details.
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