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Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:FICTION
  • SubGenre:Science Fiction / General
  • Language:English
  • Pages:200
  • eBook ISBN:9784902075922

Mr. Turtle

by Yusaku Kitano

Book Image Not Available
Overview
In a world of humans, what's a cyborg turtle to do? It's a fair question in the bizarre, compelling story of Mr. Turtle. Yusaku Kitano's science fiction masterpiece, originally published under the eponymous title Kame-kun, renews the visionary integrity that won it the Nihon SF Taisho (Japan's equivalent of the Nebula) Award in 2001 as it finds its way into English at last. Kitano's protagonist is a hero in a half shell of an altogether different sort, a killing machine designed for combat who wants only to enjoy the simple pleasures of his daily life—working a blue collar job, going to the library, and typing on his laptop—even as he is haunted by vague memories of a war on Jupiter. In order to determine his future, he must piece together his past, navigating an unsympathetic society toward revealing the novel's philosophical heartbeat. A character study of surreal wit, Mr. Turtle delivers action and insight, all the while crafting an homage to its chosen genre unlike any other.
Description
In a world of humans, what's a cyborg turtle to do? It's a fair question in the bizarre, compelling story of Mr. Turtle. Yusaku Kitano's science fiction masterpiece, originally published under the eponymous title Kame-kun, renews the visionary integrity that won it the Nihon SF Taisho (Japan's equivalent of the Nebula) Award in 2001 as it finds its way into English at last. Kitano's protagonist is a hero in a half shell of an altogether different sort, a killing machine designed for combat who wants only to enjoy the simple pleasures of his daily life—working a blue collar job, going to the library, and typing on his laptop—even as he is haunted by vague memories of a war on Jupiter. In order to determine his future, he must piece together his past, navigating an unsympathetic society toward revealing the novel's philosophical heartbeat. A character study of surreal wit, Mr. Turtle delivers action and insight, all the while crafting an homage to its chosen genre unlike any other.
About the author
Yusaku Kitano, a resident of Osaka, launched his writing career with his novel Mukashi, Kasei no Atta Basho (Where Mars Was, Once), winning the Award of Excellence in the Japan Fantasy Novel Awards in 1992. The same year he also won the Jakusaburo Katsura Yagurahai Award for best new rakugo (comic routine). He continues to write short stories and novels since, penning Kame-kun in 2001 to take the 22nd Japan SF Award, but is active in a range of genres and media. Other popular novels include Doughnuts, Kitsune no Tsuki (Fox Possession), Hitode no Hoshi (Starfish World), and Kameri, the newest addition to his turtl[e]pic.
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