Cookies must be enabled to use this web application.

To allow this site to use cookies, use the steps that apply to your browser below. If your browser is not listed below, or if you have any questions regarding this site, please contact us.

Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • 1. Select "Internet Options" from the Tools menu.
  • 2. Click on the "Privacy" tab.
  • 3. Click the "Default" button.
  • 4. Click "OK" to save changes.
Chrome Chrome
  • 1. Click the "Spanner" icon in the top right of the browser.
  • 2. Click Options and change to the "Under the Hood" tab.
  • 3. Scroll down until you see "Cookie settings:".
  • 4. Set this to "Allow all cookies".
Firefox Firefox
  • 1. Go to the "Tools" menu and select "Options".
  • 2. Click the "Privacy" icon on the top of the window.
  • 3. Click on the "Cookies" tab.
  • 4. Check the box corresponding to "Allow sites to set Cookies.
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Opera Opera
  • 1. Click on the "Tools" menu and then click Preferences.
  • 2. Change to the Advanced tab, and to the cookie section.
  • 3. Select "Accept cookies only from the site I visit" or "Accept cookies".
  • 4. Ensure "Delete new cookies when exiting Opera" is not ticked.
  • 5. Click OK.
Netscape and Mozilla Suite Netscape and Mozilla Suite
  • 1. Select "Preferences" from the Edit menu.
  • 2. Click on the arrow next to "Privacy & Security".
  • 3. Under "Privacy & Security" select "Cookies".
  • 4. Select "Enable all cookies".
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Safari Safari
  • 1. Click on the "Cog" icon in Safari.
  • 2. Click Preferences.
  • 3. Change to the Security tab.
  • 4. Select "Only from sites I visit" or "Allow".
  • 5. Close the dialog using the cross.
Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:POETRY
  • SubGenre:Inspirational & Religious
  • Language:Greek, Modern (1453-)
  • Pages:268
  • Format:Paperback
  • Paperback ISBN:9781098372781

It is Fun Riding Around the Sun

Poems of a Greek Immigrant

by Theodore Tolios

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Overview
Theodore Tolios was born in 1935 in a small village, Agios Cosmas, in the northwestern region of Greece. In 1956, he immigrated to the United States and settled in Haverhill, Massachusetts, where he currently lives with his wife of 57 years, Erato Kafteranis, and surrounded by his children and grandchildren. These poems and essays reflect a life story— the hardships of war, famine, migration, and the joys of family, friends, and community.
Description
Theodore Tolios was born in 1935 in a small village, Agios Cosmas, in the northwestern region of Greece. In 1956, he immigrated to the United States and settled in Haverhill, Massachusetts, where he currently lives with his wife of 57 years, Erato Kafteranis, and surrounded by his children and grandchildren. These poems and essays reflect a life story— the hardships of war, famine, migration, and the joys of family, friends, and community.
About the author
Theodore Tolios: "My mother used to walk to a nearby village weekly to get supplies for our home. When she was gone, my grandfather used to watch me, my older brother, and my older sister. When I was four years old, I left my village of Agios Cosmas in the northwest of Greece to follow her on her weekly errand run, without my grandfather realizing I was gone. When I reached the neighboring village, my mother had already left. I walked all day, passing three villages, but made it back home to find my mother and my grandfather crying. Eighty-one years later, my mother's tears of joy and anger remain indelibly imprinted on my memory. In 1941, Greece was experiencing a famine. My mother served us zucchini and potatoes. I didn't like zucchini, so I started to complain. My mother started to cry and said, "I don't have anything else to give to you." And I said to myself that I would never say no to whatever food is offered to me ever again. In 1945, when I was ten years old, Greeks celebrated the end of World War II only to be immediately submerged in a Civil War that would affect mostly the northern part of Greece. A military conflict ensued in my small village between the nationalists and the communists, and we ran to the fields to avoid the violence. My mother sent me home for much needed supplies. While walking to my village, a communist soldier ordered me to escort another wounded communist soldier to the neighboring village. I was terrified, because the communist soldiers used to take young boys by force and compel them to fight. Luckily someone saw me and notified my mother. She quickly came to my rescue and fought for my release. We ran into the fields and hid there all night. That day my cousin was not as lucky, as he was taken and never returned to Greece. He was sent to Poland, where he lived for the rest of his life. During the Civil War, the national government forced villagers to move into the larger towns and force them to come out of hiding. My family moved to the town of Trikala. While living in Trikala, I was able to attend high school and earn a diploma, which was not easily afforded to Greeks who lived in villages. In school I wrote my first poem. My teacher was very impressed and said that I had talent, but I didn't listen nor act on my writing talent because my heart and mind were set on coming to America. In1956, I arrived in the United States, one day before the presidential election between Dwight Eisenhower and Adelaide Stevenson. I settled in Haverhill, Massachusetts and worked in the shoe factories, doubled shifts, from 7am to 11pm. In 1958, I was drafted for military service, and basic training at Fort Dix, New Jersey. After I finished , I was sent home with an honorable discharge for not speaking the language fluently. After service, there was no future for me in the shoe factories, so I went to school for hairdressing with goals of opening up a business. In 1963, I met my wife, Erato Kafteranis, and we married. In 1964, I opened a hair salon. My wife went to hairdressing school and the two of us worked together side-by-side for 56 years. We raised two daughters. I eventually listened to my high school teacher and started writing poems mainly to celebrate events, make jokes. and some political, some serious and some satirical. My book reflects my life story—the hardships of war, famine, migration, and the joys of family, friends, and community, by a simple man who left the village and found his way home."
Thanks for submitting a review!

Your review will need to be approved by the author before being posted.

See Inside
Front Cover

Loading book cover...

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Session Expiration WarningYour session is due to expire.

Your online session is due to expire shortly.
Would you like to extend your session and remain logged in?

Session Expired

Your session has expired.We're sorry, but your online session has expired.
Please log back into your account to continue.

This site uses cookies. Continuing to use this site without changing your cookie settings means that you consent to those cookies to enhance site navigation and the overall user experience. Learn more about our privacy policy or learn more about how to turn off cookies.