Cookies must be enabled to use this web application.

To allow this site to use cookies, use the steps that apply to your browser below. If your browser is not listed below, or if you have any questions regarding this site, please contact us.

Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • 1. Select "Internet Options" from the Tools menu.
  • 2. Click on the "Privacy" tab.
  • 3. Click the "Default" button.
  • 4. Click "OK" to save changes.
Chrome Chrome
  • 1. Click the "Spanner" icon in the top right of the browser.
  • 2. Click Options and change to the "Under the Hood" tab.
  • 3. Scroll down until you see "Cookie settings:".
  • 4. Set this to "Allow all cookies".
Firefox Firefox
  • 1. Go to the "Tools" menu and select "Options".
  • 2. Click the "Privacy" icon on the top of the window.
  • 3. Click on the "Cookies" tab.
  • 4. Check the box corresponding to "Allow sites to set Cookies.
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Opera Opera
  • 1. Click on the "Tools" menu and then click Preferences.
  • 2. Change to the Advanced tab, and to the cookie section.
  • 3. Select "Accept cookies only from the site I visit" or "Accept cookies".
  • 4. Ensure "Delete new cookies when exiting Opera" is not ticked.
  • 5. Click OK.
Netscape and Mozilla Suite Netscape and Mozilla Suite
  • 1. Select "Preferences" from the Edit menu.
  • 2. Click on the arrow next to "Privacy & Security".
  • 3. Under "Privacy & Security" select "Cookies".
  • 4. Select "Enable all cookies".
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Safari Safari
  • 1. Click on the "Cog" icon in Safari.
  • 2. Click Preferences.
  • 3. Change to the Security tab.
  • 4. Select "Only from sites I visit" or "Allow".
  • 5. Close the dialog using the cross.
Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available

See inside

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available

See inside

Down Here in the Warmth

Overview


Militia on the streets of New York City? A police shooting of a young black couple (the Martins) leads to protests that escalate into riots. The riots culminate with the deaths of a white couple: renowned civil rights attorney's, Stanley and Theresa Milgram. The murder was broadcast live by a local news helicopter. The media plays the clip incessantly; unaware of the trauma it's causing the nation. A small militia group feels this is their calling and drive down to New York. A bloodbath ensues. The world watches as NYC spins out of control. The National Guard has been called in. And the mayor seems to think that the only way the violence can be quelled, is for the Milgrams' two sons to come out and call for calm….but they won't.
Read more

Description


Militia on the streets of New York City? A police shooting of a young black couple (the Martins) leads to protests that escalate into riots. The riots culminate with the deaths of a white couple: renowned civil rights attorney's, Stanley and Theresa Milgram. The murder was broadcast live by a local news helicopter. The media plays the clip incessantly; unaware of the trauma it's causing the nation. A small militia group feels this is their calling and drive down to New York. A bloodbath ensues. The world watches as NYC spins out of control. The National Guard has been called in. And the mayor seems to think that the only way the violence can be quelled, is for the Milgrams' two sons to come out and call for calm….but they won't.
Read more

About the author


Euel Arden was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. He now lives in NYC.

Read more

Book details

Genre:FICTION

Subgenre:Literary

Language:English

Pages:374

Format:Paperback

eBook ISBN:9781098319267

Paperback ISBN:9781098319250


Overview


Militia on the streets of New York City? A police shooting of a young black couple (the Martins) leads to protests that escalate into riots. The riots culminate with the deaths of a white couple: renowned civil rights attorney's, Stanley and Theresa Milgram. The murder was broadcast live by a local news helicopter. The media plays the clip incessantly; unaware of the trauma it's causing the nation. A small militia group feels this is their calling and drive down to New York. A bloodbath ensues. The world watches as NYC spins out of control. The National Guard has been called in. And the mayor seems to think that the only way the violence can be quelled, is for the Milgrams' two sons to come out and call for calm….but they won't.

Read more

Description


Militia on the streets of New York City? A police shooting of a young black couple (the Martins) leads to protests that escalate into riots. The riots culminate with the deaths of a white couple: renowned civil rights attorney's, Stanley and Theresa Milgram. The murder was broadcast live by a local news helicopter. The media plays the clip incessantly; unaware of the trauma it's causing the nation. A small militia group feels this is their calling and drive down to New York. A bloodbath ensues. The world watches as NYC spins out of control. The National Guard has been called in. And the mayor seems to think that the only way the violence can be quelled, is for the Milgrams' two sons to come out and call for calm….but they won't.

Read more

About the author


Euel Arden was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. He now lives in NYC.

Read more


Book Reviews

to submit a book review
susan
Perfect book for the times When I first heard about this book I thought it was a simple, ‘black vs white’ (boorish) thing. But honestly, even though the entire book it set against the backdrop of riots and militia in Manhattan, it really has little to do with race. It is mostly about how the two main characters, Virgil and Shazz (black and white respectively) struggle to make correct decisions. Most of the characters in this book are going through the same process, and some of them are dealing with the decisions they have already made. All are realizing these decisions don’t just affect them, but the people they love. The book starts out with some pretty hard to bare violence. There is a police shooting of a young black couple, driving home from a party. They were in the front seat. In the backseat is their 3 month old baby in a car seat. The parents both die, the child escapes harm. But the pictures are shown all over the media. This leads to protests and riots and the death of a white couple (who just happen to be famous civil rights attorneys) the Milgrams. The media coverage of the two events incite anger and distrust. Interestingly, in this book there is no POV from any member of the media, as we have from everyone else. (including miltia members) The media is portrayed as a weapon, and a tool. The book then branches out. You have Manny, a lawyer who worked with the Milgrams. Her family emigrated from (I think) Egypt when she was younger. She is just as committed to the civil rights as they were. There is a Mayor who views everything through the lens of his political future, and who seems on the verge of a breakdown. You have the Milgram’s two sons, Lestor and Shazz. Who everyone expects to come out and call for peace because they were raised by such “saints”. But they do not. And this seems to be one of the major points in the book. Do they let anger control their decisions? Or do they do what is right for society as a whole? My favorite characters in the book are the Boneheads. They are two ex-college football players, one black and one white, who live together in the projects as if they never left college. They live on Virgil’s floor. The scenes of the camaraderie on Virgil’s hallway with all the different characters (none of usual clichés thank goodness) are perfection. There is also Forrest and his militia and their POV’s. And the author does an excellent job of humanizing such lost characters. To the point where you are actually rooting for one or two of them. And then you have the surreal characters of Ida, Jabba, and the Jodies, who seem to be pulling all the strings and are in control of the media. In book two the author begins giving headings to sections like they used to do in 19th century novels. (see Melville or Twain’s chapter formatting) And by book three things move fast and wrap up beautifully. There is lots of great writing here and the author almost seems to be riffing at times. One subtle but effective thing I noticed, was that during certain scenes he jumps into present tense. Certain particularly frenetic scenes involving gunfire and basically combat on the streets of Manhattan, really seemed to pop when I first read them. It was only after going back to try and figure out what made them so effective (to improve my own writing) did I realized that it was because of the tense switch. The book never seems to lull, and when there is action you are totally drawn into it. There are also more than a few beautiful scenes where I actually teared up. (Shazz and his mother scenes, Virgil and his grandmother, Ed (a militia member) and his grandfather) I highly recommend this book. With all that’s going on in the world right now with the BLM protests and the media manipulation, it really is the right book at the right time. Read more
Thanks for submitting a review!

Your review will need to be approved by the author before being posted.

See Inside
Front Cover

Loading book cover...

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Session Expiration WarningYour session is due to expire.

Your online session is due to expire shortly.
Would you like to extend your session and remain logged in?

Session Expired

Your session has expired.We're sorry, but your online session has expired.
Please log back into your account to continue.

This site uses cookies. Continuing to use this site without changing your cookie settings means that you consent to those cookies to enhance site navigation and the overall user experience. Learn more about our privacy policy or learn more about how to turn off cookies.