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About the author


Bryan And Barbara have been married for 47 years and have two wonderful children Sean and Dawn Broderick. Both Barb and Bryan were raised in St. Louis Missouri and the surrounding areas. The Broderick's and the Bryan's have a rich history in the area. The Broderick's emigrated from Ireland in 1840's, The Bryan's came from Ireland in the 1750's. Both the Bryan's and the Boone's fought in the revolutionary war under George Washington. Through the years Bryan Broderick enjoyed growing up with his father taking him to Gray Summit, MO. Where they cared for the family grave site and visited with the many relatives in the area. These were Bryan's Grandmothers people.. My Grandmother would come with us on many occasions and visit with her many cousins. Dad and I would mow the grass and tend to the graves at the old cemetery and then bring Gran out for her inspection and any final treatments she felt needed to be done. While there Gran would tell me who each and every one of the people were that were buried there and their stories. Her father William S. Bryan was one of the last pioneers buried there. We would go back to Arch Miles house and eat and visit. Many times we would stay overnight and tell stories till late at night. (there was no television and the radio wasn't very good). Those stories were about life during the Civil War and the recovery there after. Two of the eldest cousins Garrie and Maude were 101 and 103. They had experienced those days and related them to me a small boy of 10 years old. The history and the stories they told were amazing and held my attention for hours on end. They would tell of the days when Bill Cody would stay at he farm and how my great grandfather had loaned him $600 to start his Wild West Show. They would describe his long white hair and buckskin coat with the long fringe. And how flamboyant he was. Cousin Garrie would say he wore so much perfume you could smell him when he got off the train in Gray Summit. That way they knew he was coming to visit. And of course the stories of Daniel Boone, our many other relatives. Indians as friend and enemies. And the many black neighbors that visited the house and stayed for supper or lemonade. The stories told by the neighbors of color and how their mothers and fathers were owned by my great uncles. How they stayed and farmed and partnered with them after the war. And how they had prospered with the land given to them in trade for help on the big farm. Soon their own farms grew while the Big Farm was slowly sold off bit by bit. Finally the Big House was bought by Sid Solomon and later owned by Lee Kling. It is now called Grayling Farm. But that will changed with time. The neighbors told me stories of a "colored" man that drove and helped the country Doctor on his rounds. He set my Great Aunt's arm when she broke it. And he was respected as a great hero that had saved the life of my Great Great Aunt when she was lost in the woods for several days. You will read about this loved and respected man in the many stories written by my Great Grandfather. Barb and I did not write these accounts of the early days of Missouri and Daniel Boone. These accounts were preserved by my Great Grandfather, some of the stories are first hand, but most are told to him by his father that lived with Daniel and Rebecca Boone. His father (My Great Great Grandfather Bryan was Daniel and Rebecca's favorite he owned the farm next to Boone's). These stories are told in the vernacular of the times. WE have made no attempt to change the language used in those times. This is how people spoke and referred to each other. There is great respect for people no matter their race. The pioneers valued you on merit, not the color of your skin. Within the same lifetime enemies became friends and neighbors. Everyone lived off the land and those that could not, were cared for as best could be by others. We stand to learn a great deal from the people in our past. If others don't destroy it.
Read more
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Daniel Boone and His Neighbors
Romance and Realism of the Pioneer Life
by Bryan Broderick and Barbara Broderick

Overview


A collection of stories about Daniel Boone and his neighbors. A first hand account of the early pioneers in and around the greater St. Charles and St. Louis, Missouri area. This collection has been stored in my families basements for three generations. We found these and many other documents in several boxes with my Great Grandfathers name on it. It took over a year to get to this point.
Read more

Description


In this book you will find a collection of stories as they are preserved by my Great Grandfather William S. Bryan. My Great Grandfather was one of the last of the pioneers to settle the wilderness of St. Charles County as it is known today. His neighbors and the neighbors of his father and grandfather are well known names in and around the St. Louis, St. Charles and Franklin county areas. Although many of these names are now given to creeks, towns, counties and bridges. They are people that actually lived and carved out a life in the wilderness. Written in the language and slang used by people of the day Barb and I have purposely not altered words or the manner in which they were used. WE are preserving history as it happened. Not as others would like you to think it did. These writing are done in a manner that you would experience as if you were sitting in someone's living room and were being told by some old timer that had been there. Well in most cases that's exactly how these stories are related. In this book there is a description of Daniel Boone, from head to toe. At the time there was no photo's or movies. When a person was observed and described to others there is a certain richness and power in that description. I was very taken with this ability that I feel is now lost by our generation. After you read this description in the book I'm sure you too will be impressed with it's power to give you a mental picture of Boone. I have no doubt that I would know Boone if I came face to face with him, the description is that complete. There are stories of everyday life, dirt floors, log homes or living in a cave. Eating from tree bark bowls, cooking on open fires, sleeping on piles of buffalo and deer skins. Today we would not even consider living under such conditions, And most of us would simply not survive. (as many of them didn't). I'm sure many readers will find that there are many explanations of why things are done the way they are today and at the same time how silly some of the things were done in the days of old. But reading these little bits of history will open your eyes to how we evolved into what we are today. And as Americans we all retain in our hearts a power that only we have that others respect. Ours is a short history compared to others, but I feel it is much richer.
Read more

Overview


A collection of stories about Daniel Boone and his neighbors. A first hand account of the early pioneers in and around the greater St. Charles and St. Louis, Missouri area. This collection has been stored in my families basements for three generations. We found these and many other documents in several boxes with my Great Grandfathers name on it. It took over a year to get to this point.

Read more

Description


In this book you will find a collection of stories as they are preserved by my Great Grandfather William S. Bryan. My Great Grandfather was one of the last of the pioneers to settle the wilderness of St. Charles County as it is known today. His neighbors and the neighbors of his father and grandfather are well known names in and around the St. Louis, St. Charles and Franklin county areas. Although many of these names are now given to creeks, towns, counties and bridges. They are people that actually lived and carved out a life in the wilderness. Written in the language and slang used by people of the day Barb and I have purposely not altered words or the manner in which they were used. WE are preserving history as it happened. Not as others would like you to think it did. These writing are done in a manner that you would experience as if you were sitting in someone's living room and were being told by some old timer that had been there. Well in most cases that's exactly how these stories are related. In this book there is a description of Daniel Boone, from head to toe. At the time there was no photo's or movies. When a person was observed and described to others there is a certain richness and power in that description. I was very taken with this ability that I feel is now lost by our generation. After you read this description in the book I'm sure you too will be impressed with it's power to give you a mental picture of Boone. I have no doubt that I would know Boone if I came face to face with him, the description is that complete. There are stories of everyday life, dirt floors, log homes or living in a cave. Eating from tree bark bowls, cooking on open fires, sleeping on piles of buffalo and deer skins. Today we would not even consider living under such conditions, And most of us would simply not survive. (as many of them didn't). I'm sure many readers will find that there are many explanations of why things are done the way they are today and at the same time how silly some of the things were done in the days of old. But reading these little bits of history will open your eyes to how we evolved into what we are today. And as Americans we all retain in our hearts a power that only we have that others respect. Ours is a short history compared to others, but I feel it is much richer.

Read more

Book details

Genre:HISTORY

Subgenre:United States / State & Local / Midwest (IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI)

Language:English

Pages:344

Format:Paperback

eBook ISBN:9781098383749

Paperback ISBN:9781098383732


Overview


A collection of stories about Daniel Boone and his neighbors. A first hand account of the early pioneers in and around the greater St. Charles and St. Louis, Missouri area. This collection has been stored in my families basements for three generations. We found these and many other documents in several boxes with my Great Grandfathers name on it. It took over a year to get to this point.

Read more

Description


In this book you will find a collection of stories as they are preserved by my Great Grandfather William S. Bryan. My Great Grandfather was one of the last of the pioneers to settle the wilderness of St. Charles County as it is known today. His neighbors and the neighbors of his father and grandfather are well known names in and around the St. Louis, St. Charles and Franklin county areas. Although many of these names are now given to creeks, towns, counties and bridges. They are people that actually lived and carved out a life in the wilderness. Written in the language and slang used by people of the day Barb and I have purposely not altered words or the manner in which they were used. WE are preserving history as it happened. Not as others would like you to think it did. These writing are done in a manner that you would experience as if you were sitting in someone's living room and were being told by some old timer that had been there. Well in most cases that's exactly how these stories are related. In this book there is a description of Daniel Boone, from head to toe. At the time there was no photo's or movies. When a person was observed and described to others there is a certain richness and power in that description. I was very taken with this ability that I feel is now lost by our generation. After you read this description in the book I'm sure you too will be impressed with it's power to give you a mental picture of Boone. I have no doubt that I would know Boone if I came face to face with him, the description is that complete. There are stories of everyday life, dirt floors, log homes or living in a cave. Eating from tree bark bowls, cooking on open fires, sleeping on piles of buffalo and deer skins. Today we would not even consider living under such conditions, And most of us would simply not survive. (as many of them didn't). I'm sure many readers will find that there are many explanations of why things are done the way they are today and at the same time how silly some of the things were done in the days of old. But reading these little bits of history will open your eyes to how we evolved into what we are today. And as Americans we all retain in our hearts a power that only we have that others respect. Ours is a short history compared to others, but I feel it is much richer.

Read more

About the author


Bryan And Barbara have been married for 47 years and have two wonderful children Sean and Dawn Broderick. Both Barb and Bryan were raised in St. Louis Missouri and the surrounding areas. The Broderick's and the Bryan's have a rich history in the area. The Broderick's emigrated from Ireland in 1840's, The Bryan's came from Ireland in the 1750's. Both the Bryan's and the Boone's fought in the revolutionary war under George Washington. Through the years Bryan Broderick enjoyed growing up with his father taking him to Gray Summit, MO. Where they cared for the family grave site and visited with the many relatives in the area. These were Bryan's Grandmothers people.. My Grandmother would come with us on many occasions and visit with her many cousins. Dad and I would mow the grass and tend to the graves at the old cemetery and then bring Gran out for her inspection and any final treatments she felt needed to be done. While there Gran would tell me who each and every one of the people were that were buried there and their stories. Her father William S. Bryan was one of the last pioneers buried there. We would go back to Arch Miles house and eat and visit. Many times we would stay overnight and tell stories till late at night. (there was no television and the radio wasn't very good). Those stories were about life during the Civil War and the recovery there after. Two of the eldest cousins Garrie and Maude were 101 and 103. They had experienced those days and related them to me a small boy of 10 years old. The history and the stories they told were amazing and held my attention for hours on end. They would tell of the days when Bill Cody would stay at he farm and how my great grandfather had loaned him $600 to start his Wild West Show. They would describe his long white hair and buckskin coat with the long fringe. And how flamboyant he was. Cousin Garrie would say he wore so much perfume you could smell him when he got off the train in Gray Summit. That way they knew he was coming to visit. And of course the stories of Daniel Boone, our many other relatives. Indians as friend and enemies. And the many black neighbors that visited the house and stayed for supper or lemonade. The stories told by the neighbors of color and how their mothers and fathers were owned by my great uncles. How they stayed and farmed and partnered with them after the war. And how they had prospered with the land given to them in trade for help on the big farm. Soon their own farms grew while the Big Farm was slowly sold off bit by bit. Finally the Big House was bought by Sid Solomon and later owned by Lee Kling. It is now called Grayling Farm. But that will changed with time. The neighbors told me stories of a "colored" man that drove and helped the country Doctor on his rounds. He set my Great Aunt's arm when she broke it. And he was respected as a great hero that had saved the life of my Great Great Aunt when she was lost in the woods for several days. You will read about this loved and respected man in the many stories written by my Great Grandfather. Barb and I did not write these accounts of the early days of Missouri and Daniel Boone. These accounts were preserved by my Great Grandfather, some of the stories are first hand, but most are told to him by his father that lived with Daniel and Rebecca Boone. His father (My Great Great Grandfather Bryan was Daniel and Rebecca's favorite he owned the farm next to Boone's). These stories are told in the vernacular of the times. WE have made no attempt to change the language used in those times. This is how people spoke and referred to each other. There is great respect for people no matter their race. The pioneers valued you on merit, not the color of your skin. Within the same lifetime enemies became friends and neighbors. Everyone lived off the land and those that could not, were cared for as best could be by others. We stand to learn a great deal from the people in our past. If others don't destroy it.

Read more
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