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Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:HISTORY
  • SubGenre:Military / United States
  • Language:English
  • Pages:254
  • Format:Paperback
  • eBook ISBN:9781543969481
  • Paperback ISBN:9781543967975

A Marine's Letters from Nicaragua

by David Ekardt

Book Image Not Available
Overview

The following story is about an extraordinary Marine, Thomas Grant Bruce, Master Sgt., Lt. in the Guardia Nacional of Nicaragua. Bruce was highly decorated, highly motivated and committed to the Corps, his men and especially his wife. He had earned the French Croix de Geure and Silver Star for his actions in World War I. He had been one of the Mail Guards after the war, participated in the Sesquicentennial celebration of the signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia, and served as a recruiter. He had been in Nicaragua for a couple of years of 1922-1924, then returned in 1927 which is the period these letters cover. The documents and letters used in this book came to light in an unusual way. I was giving history talks to visitors at the Tampa Bay History Center on the Fourth of July, and got into a conversation with a gentleman about the local history. He explained that he had an extensive collection of artifacts collected over the years and extended an invitation to see them. While there he brought out an old file box that he indicated that he had purchased it at a yard sale a few years prior. In it were the personal copies of enlistments, letters of commendations and a large group of letters written by M.Sgt. Bruce to his wife in 1927 from Nicaragua. He was certain after reading my previous book, that I could tell a story with the contents of the box. The letters that Bruce wrote to his wife were very articulate, detailed and informative to his everyday life, duties, and actions that he had been in. It became clear that here was an exceptional Marine. His enthusiasm and dedication to his mission and his men was very apparent. It came across that he took his mission to thwart the actions of rebel leader Sandino as a very personal mission. These letters give a glimpse into a bygone era, one of the several 'Banana Wars' that the Marines were involved in during the early 1900's. From the details in his letters about his everyday activities to the descriptions of the battle that earned him the Navy Cross, it is a story worth telling. What follows in his story, a brief summation of his years leading up to 1927 which the letters from Nicaragua covers. HIs letters shed light on our involvement in that country those many years ago. Semper Fi.

Description

The following story is about an extraordinary Marine, Thomas Grant Bruce, Master Sgt., Lt. in the Guardia Nacional of Nicaragua. Bruce was highly decorated, highly motivated and committed to the Corps, his men and especially his wife. He had earned the French Croix de Geure and Silver Star for his actions in World War I. He had been one of the Mail Guards after the war, participated in the Sesquicentennial celebration of the signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia, and served as a recruiter. He had been in Nicaragua for a couple of years of 1922-1924, then returned in 1927 which is the period these letters cover. The documents and letters used in this book came to light in an unusual way. I was giving history talks to visitors at the Tampa Bay History Center on the Fourth of July, and got into a conversation with a gentleman about the local history. He explained that he had an extensive collection of artifacts collected over the years and extended an invitation to see them. I was contacted by him a few days later and arranged an evening to view his collection. While there he brought out an old file box that he indicated that he had purchased it at a yard sale a few years prior. In it were the personal copies of enlistments, letters of commendations and a large group of letters written by M.Sgt. Bruce to his wife in 1927 from Nicaragua. He suggested that I take the box home and see what they all contained for he had never gone through all that was in the box. He was certain after reading my previous book, that I could tell a story with the contents of the box. I spent the next three days going through all the material and was astounded at the wealth of information that the box contained. The letters that Bruce wrote to his wife were very articulate, detailed and informative to his everyday life, duties, and actions that he had been in. It became clear that here was an exceptional Marine. His enthusiasm and dedication to his mission and his men was very apparent. It came across that he took his mission to thwart the actions of rebel leader Sandino as a very personal mission. These letters give a glimpse into a bygone era, one of the several 'Banana Wars' that the Marines were involved in during the early 1900's. From the details in his letters about his everyday activities to the descriptions of the battle that earned him the Navy Cross, it is a story worth telling. What follows is his story, a brief summation of his years leading up to 1927 which the letters from Nicaragua covers. His letters shed light on our involvement in that country those many years ago. Semper Fi

About the author
David Ekardt is a consummate writer/story-teller of tales from the American wilderness and early Revolutionary days. A native of Cincinnati, Ohio, Ekardt grew up in the Ohio River Valley, where some of the greatest legends of the revolutionary-era American frontier walked and fought for freedom. One of his works profiles one of those legends, Sam Brady. In 'Brady's Rangers', Ekardt relates the daring deeds of those dauntless Rangers who daily put their lives on the line to protect the settlers from British-backed Indian raiders. He has also written an article for the Navy History magazine, 'U.S.S. Fort Henry, Terror of the Gulf', about the most successful Union blockade ship off the coast of Florida in the Civil War and her Medal of Honor recipient, Marine Sgt. Christopher Nugent. Also, his article 'A Matter of Honor, the Taking of the Pensacola Naval Yard', was featured in the Florida Frontier Gazette, history magazine. His article, "Fleet Marines of the Civil War" appeared in the Civil War Historian Magazine. He has a few articles on the Navy Marine Living History Association website including 'The Great Navy Salt Raids', which documents the numerous raids by the Navy and Marines on the critical salt production of the South during the Civil War mostly in Florida. His book, "The U.S. Marines in the Second Creek and Second Seminole Wars" is now available and is unique as being the only book on the subject. It has been entered in the Marine Research Archives in Quantico Virginia, The U.S. Naval Academy Research library, the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Seminole Museum research library and the Tampa Bay History Center research library. His new book, "A Marine's Letters from Nicaragua, details the life of a real hero, Master Sgt. Thomas Grant Bruce, USMC. Ekardt attended Miami University at Oxford, Ohio, where he studied writing. A veteran of the United States Marine Corps, Ekardt served with 1st Radio Battalion, an intelligence unit in Vietnam. David has managed to reunite many members of his old unit and has sponsored reunions for several years. He recently gave the dedication speech for the memorial plaque for the 1st Radio Battalion Marines who died in Vietnam. The dedication was held at the Cryptology Museum at Corry Station, Pensacola, Florida. Ekardt makes his home on the west coast of Florida where he has raised his two children. He pursues his writing career after retiring from the State of Florida. He also participates in Civil War reenactments portraying a Marine of that time. He also portrays a Marine during the Second Seminole War and has given talks at Fort Foster. He gives talks on the history of the Marines in Florida and the Civil War and Second Seminole War at the events, special historical events and schools. Ekardt is an avid outdoorsman and has taught archery, canoeing, camping and wilderness survival to many Scouts over the years.


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