Cookies must be enabled to use this web application.

To allow this site to use cookies, use the steps that apply to your browser below. If your browser is not listed below, or if you have any questions regarding this site, please contact us.

Microsoft Internet Explorer
  • 1. Select "Internet Options" from the Tools menu.
  • 2. Click on the "Privacy" tab.
  • 3. Click the "Default" button.
  • 4. Click "OK" to save changes.
Chrome Chrome
  • 1. Click the "Spanner" icon in the top right of the browser.
  • 2. Click Options and change to the "Under the Hood" tab.
  • 3. Scroll down until you see "Cookie settings:".
  • 4. Set this to "Allow all cookies".
Firefox Firefox
  • 1. Go to the "Tools" menu and select "Options".
  • 2. Click the "Privacy" icon on the top of the window.
  • 3. Click on the "Cookies" tab.
  • 4. Check the box corresponding to "Allow sites to set Cookies.
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Opera Opera
  • 1. Click on the "Tools" menu and then click Preferences.
  • 2. Change to the Advanced tab, and to the cookie section.
  • 3. Select "Accept cookies only from the site I visit" or "Accept cookies".
  • 4. Ensure "Delete new cookies when exiting Opera" is not ticked.
  • 5. Click OK.
Netscape and Mozilla Suite Netscape and Mozilla Suite
  • 1. Select "Preferences" from the Edit menu.
  • 2. Click on the arrow next to "Privacy & Security".
  • 3. Under "Privacy & Security" select "Cookies".
  • 4. Select "Enable all cookies".
  • 5. Click "OK" to save changes.
Safari Safari
  • 1. Click on the "Cog" icon in Safari.
  • 2. Click Preferences.
  • 3. Change to the Security tab.
  • 4. Select "Only from sites I visit" or "Allow".
  • 5. Close the dialog using the cross.
Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
  • SubGenre:Military
  • Language:English
  • Pages:180
  • Format:Paperback
  • eBook ISBN:9781667800479
  • Paperback ISBN:9781667800462

A Marine 3531 to 0311

by Michael E. Hearndon

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Overview
This is an autobiography, Memoir if you will of four years of my life as a United States Marine. This particular story is dated from April 1963 through November 1967, while I was on active duty in the Marines. It also involves two tours of duty in Vietnam. It begins with enlistment while still in high school, boot camp, and then into my first year at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, where I became a problem for the authorities, and my resulting turn around. It then transitions to the new me, experiences of traveling overseas, not only crossing the Atlantic to Spain, but also the Pacific to Okinawa, and finally, to Vietnam. While in Vietnam on my first tour, I became an "experiment", which resulted in some personal satisfaction. Next is my rotation back to the States, and new experiences as a non-commissioned officer. It was a time of homecoming and the renewing of a friendship from my first tour of duty in Vietnam. Then, I experienced more training and harassments, resulting in my extension of enlistment so that I could return for a second tour of duty in Vietnam. This is when the war in Vietnam really started to increase in events that could only be noticed by someone retuning there for a second tour. Someone like me, who has traveled through the northern part of South Vietnam right up to the Demilitarized Zone. This is when the story really gets to the heart of my memories. The changing of MOS (military occupational specialty) duties physically, but not on Marine Corps paper, where a truck driver/mechanic becomes a real Marine with a rifle. A grunt! An infantryman. The fears of not knowing, what is about to happen, and what to do, when it happens. These fears are not so much for myself, but for the Marines I feel responsible for. Then comes the relief from stress, it is all over. And recovery is now in a hospital. But yes, I, like a million others, still claim to this day to be a United States Marine.
Description
This is an autobiography, Memoir if you will of four years of my life as a United States Marine. This particular story is dated from April 1963 through November 1967, while I was on active duty in the Marines. It also involves two tours of duty in Vietnam. It begins with enlistment while still in high school, boot camp, and then into my first year at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, where I became a problem for the authorities, and my resulting turn around. It then transitions to the new me, experiences of traveling overseas, not only crossing the Atlantic to Spain, but also the Pacific to Okinawa, and finally, to Vietnam. While in Vietnam on my first tour, I became an "experiment", which resulted in some personal satisfaction. Next is my rotation back to the States, and new experiences as a non-commissioned officer. It was a time of homecoming and the renewing of a friendship from my first tour of duty in Vietnam. Then, I experienced more training and harassments, resulting in my extension of enlistment so that I could return for a second tour of duty in Vietnam. This is when the war in Vietnam really started to increase in events that could only be noticed by someone retuning there for a second tour. Someone like me, who has traveled through the northern part of South Vietnam right up to the Demilitarized Zone. This is when the story really gets to the heart of my memories. The changing of MOS (military occupational specialty) duties physically, but not on Marine Corps paper, where a truck driver/mechanic becomes a real Marine with a rifle. A grunt! An infantryman. The fears of not knowing, what is about to happen, and what to do, when it happens. These fears are not so much for myself, but for the Marines I feel responsible for. Then comes the relief from stress, it is all over. And recovery is now in a hospital. But yes, I, like a million others, still claim to this day to be a United States Marine.
About the author
This is an autobiography, Memoir if you will of four years of my life as a United States Marine. This particular story is dated from April 1963 through November 1967, while I was on active duty in the Marines. It also involves two tours of duty in Vietnam. It begins with enlistment while still in high school, boot camp, and then into my first year at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, where I became a problem for the authorities, and my resulting turn around. It then transitions to the new me, experiences of traveling overseas, not only crossing the Atlantic to Spain, but also the Pacific to Okinawa, and finally, to Vietnam. While in Vietnam on my first tour, I became an "experiment", which resulted in some personal satisfaction. Next is my rotation back to the States, and new experiences as a non-commissioned officer. It was a time of homecoming and the renewing of a friendship from my first tour of duty in Vietnam. Then, I experienced more training and harassments, resulting in my extension of enlistment so that I could return for a second tour of duty in Vietnam. This is when the war in Vietnam really started to increase in events that could only be noticed by someone retuning there for a second tour. Someone like me, who has traveled through the northern part of South Vietnam right up to the Demilitarized Zone. This is when the story really gets to the heart of my memories. The changing of MOS (military occupational specialty) duties physically, but not on Marine Corps paper, where a truck driver/mechanic becomes a real Marine with a rifle. A grunt! An infantryman. The fears of not knowing, what is about to happen, and what to do, when it happens. These fears are not so much for myself, but for the Marines I feel responsible for. Then comes the relief from stress, it is all over. And recovery is now in a hospital. But yes, I, like a million others, still claim to this day to be a United States Marine.
Thanks for submitting a review!

Your review will need to be approved by the author before being posted.

See Inside
Front Cover

Loading book cover...

Book Image Not Available Book Image Not Available
Session Expiration WarningYour session is due to expire.

Your online session is due to expire shortly.
Would you like to extend your session and remain logged in?

Session Expired

Your session has expired.We're sorry, but your online session has expired.
Please log back into your account to continue.

This site uses cookies. Continuing to use this site without changing your cookie settings means that you consent to those cookies to enhance site navigation and the overall user experience. Learn more about our privacy policy or learn more about how to turn off cookies.