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Book Image Not Available
Book details
  • Genre:BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
  • SubGenre:Cultural Heritage
  • Language:English
  • Pages:329
  • eBook ISBN:9781483509358

A Good Trade

Three Generations of Life and Trading in and around Gallup, NM.

by John D Kennedy

Book Image Not Available
Overview
A generational account told in the first person by a prominent Southwestern trading family. American Indians hold a fascination with people throughout the world. This family lived among the Navajo and Zuni Indian people for over one hundred years. The were prominent in protecting and contributing to the lives of many people during that time. Trading was a major part of their lives and this is a story of its impact.
Description
A generational account told by each generation in the first person. George E Kennedy, came West in search of adventure in 1898. Starting as a street car operator in Albuquerque, he was recruited to manage a company store. The store, owned by a lumber company, was in the mountains southwest of Gallup, New Mexico. Many of his customers were Navajo Indians from whom he learned their language and customs. The company owner offered to stake him in building a trading post on the Navajo reservation. In 1912 he set out for the Navajo reservation with two freight wagons; one carried building supplies and the other inventory for a new trading post. He settled in Salina Springs where he traded until 1916. The Navajos called him Hosteen Tselani, Mr. Salina. The name stuck with him no matter where he traded on the reservation. Many people became life-long customers. He sold his post and purchased Chinle Trading Post at Canyon de Chelly (shay). Later he purchased Rock Springs Trading Post near Gallup and built the largest livestock operation on the reservation. His second son, John W Kennedy, grew up in the trading business with him. John W later went to Zuni Pueblo and became a trader. From there he went to Gallup, New Mexico where he built the largest and most progressive trading company in the trading business. His son, John D, began working with him at the age of nine years. He learned the principles of business and trading and continued in his family tradition. John D left his mark by founding the Indian Arts and Crafts Association and serving on the Advisory Board of the National Park Service. All three generations were part of the greatest period of trading in Southwestern history. They began with horses and wagons and grew to airplanes and computers. Each generation left a legacy of innovation in business and trading. Their story is told in the first people with each generation as they reveal experiences and events of remarkable careers. People always say, "Write a book." This is an entertaining story of a remarkable family.
About the author
John D Kennedy is the third generation of a prominent Southwestern Indian trading family. His grandfather, George E Kennedy, came West in search of adventure. In 1898 he became the general manager of the company store for a lumber company in the mountains southwest of Gallup, New Mexico. Many customers were Navajo Indians from whom he learned their language and customs. In 1912 he set out for the Navajo reservation with two freight wagons; one carried building supplies and the other inventory for a new trading post. He settled in Salina Springs where he traded until 1916. He sold his post and purchased Chinle Trading Post at Canyon de Chelly (shay). His second son, John W Kennedy, grew up in the trading business with him. John W later went to Zuni Pueblo and became a trader. From there he went to Gallup, New Mexico where he built the largest and most progressive trading company in the trading business. His son, John D, began working with him at the age of nine years. He learned the principles of business and trading and continued in his family tradition. John D left his mark by founding the Indian Arts and Crafts Association and serving on the Advisory Board of the National Park Service. All three generations were part of the greatest period of trading in Southwestern history. They began with horses and wagons and finished with airplanes and computers. Each generation left a legacy of innovation in business and trading. Their story is told in the first people with each generation as they reveal experiences and events of remarkable careers.
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